The Claypoole family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Kingston, Jamaica, 

West Indies.

Correcting the genealogical and historical record.

Copyright 2003-2008 B. M. Chapman. All Rights Reserved.

For additions or comments, email max at claypoolefamily.com
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List of Contents                                                                                                  Section

Acknowledgements
                                                                                                     
Introduction: conflicting views on the identity of James Claypoole, Jr.                                1
                                 
James Claypoole, Jr. (c1743-1822), portrait painter of Philadelphia, Pa.
and
Jamaica and son of James Claypoole, Sr.of Philadelphia - the evidence                        2                                                                                                                                      
James Claypoole (c1742-c1813) farmer of Bedford, Somerset and
Armstrong
Co's, Pa., unrelated to James Claypoole, Sr. of Philadelphia
- the evidence
                                                                                                                3                                                                              
Conclusion: making the case for the true identity of James Claypoole, Jr.                            4                                                                                                                
References cited in text                                                                                                   5                                                                                             
Appendix   I - Timeline for James Claypoole, Sr. (1721-1784), painter, glazier, merchant
and
Sheriff of Philadelphia City and County, 1777-1780, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Appendix  II - Timeline for James Claypoole, Jr. (c1743-1822), portrait painter, limner and
Commissioner of the Supreme Court, Jamaica, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Kingston,
Jamaica, West Indies.

Appendix III - Timeline for James Claypoole, (c1742-c1813), farmer of Bedford, Somerset
& Armstrong Co's, Pennsylvania.

Appendix IV - Some contemporaries of James Claypoole Sr. of  Philadelphia Co.,
Pennsylvania, in 1755.
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Acknowledgements

Thank you to fellow Claypole/Claypool/Claypoole researchers and other kind souls in the USA, UK and Australia, who have encouraged and assisted me in my genealogical and historical research.

In particular, I’d like to thank ‘cousins’ Ros Blakemore of the UK and Monika Sheppard of Australia, for their work on the genealogy of the Claypoole family of Jamaica, and also thank Jason Mueller of Oregon, USA & Kay Schorah of Delaware, USA for their research on my behalf.

But my very special thanks go to Kathie Young of Armstrong Co., Pennsylvania, USA, who has been unstinting in her efforts to identify primary and secondary sources of information on the Claypools/Claypooles of Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland and New Jersey, and related families, and which she has most generously shared with me.

Finally, may I thank my wife, Professor Joan Abbott-Chapman of the University of Tasmania, Australia, for her editorial advice and constant support.
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Section 1


Introduction: conflicting views on the identity of James Claypoole Jr.

For over 35 years, The Claypoole Family in America, (Bracken, Claypool & Claypool, 1971 and subsequent editions) has, this paper contends, mistakenly claimed that James Claypoole, c1743-c1813, farmer, of Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, was a son of James Claypoole, Sr., 1721-1784, Sheriff of Philadelphia City and County, 1777 to 1780. The evidence presented here will make it clear that the real son of Claypoole Sr. was James Claypoole, Jr., c1743-1822, portrait painter, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Kingston, Jamaica, West Indies.

Bracken et al’s mistake is hard to understand when one becomes aware that there were a number of books and articles, such as those by Sartain, (1899) and Richardson (1970), that clearly state the relationship between the two James Claypooles (Sr. and Jr.) of Philadelphia, and which were published before Bracken et al produced their work in 1971. Equally, Bracken et al’s work contains errors that should not have been made if the subjects of that work had been fully researched. For example, it states that James Claypoole, Sr. “died about 1796 in Jamaica”. Yet the death of James Claypoole and his burial on September 22nd, 1784, at St. Paul’s churchyard, Philadelphia, was reported on September 24th, 1784 (The Pennsylvania Mercury and Universal Advertiser), letters of administration for the deceased's estate were dated the same day (Appendix 1) and in 1785, the Philadelphia Co. Orphans Court ruled that David C. Claypoole, Administrator of James Claypoole, deceased and others were entitled to distribution of the residue of Abraham Claypoole's estate (Graff, 1893, p. 61). Creating further confusion, The Claypoole Family in America claims that James Claypoole, c1743-c1813, farmer, of Armstrong County, Pa had a son, born in 1779, named “David Chambers Claypoole, II” (Bracken et al, 1971, p. 44). However, current researchers are unable to find any evidence, from either primary or other secondary sources, that names this son as other than “David Claypoole” or “David Claypole”, nor have they found independent evidence that David’s father was known as “James Claypoole, Jr.,” as claimed by Bracken et al. 

This summary paper is the product of lengthy historical and genealogical investigations, some of which are reported in the Appendices. It makes the case, with supporting evidence and references, that James Claypoole, the true son of James Claypoole senior, was a portrait painter of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Kingston, Jamaica, and is a distinctly different person from James Claypoole, farmer, of Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, whose lineage and antecedents are at this point unknown.
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Section 2


James Claypoole, Jr., (c1743-1822), portrait painter of Philadelphia and Jamaica, son of James Claypoole, Sr. (1721-1784) – the evidence.


Overwhelming support for the argument put forward in this paper is provided in a letter written in 1812, which mentions James Claypoole, son of James Claypoole, Sr. This letter, by the colonial and revolutionary American artist, Charles Willson Peale, is quoted verbatim in the book by Sartain (1899) – the original letter is now held by the American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia.  Charles W. Peale’s brother, and fellow limner, was James Peale, who became James Claypoole Sr.’s son-in-law in 1782 and therefore, the brother-in-law of James Claypoole Jr., portrait painter, of Kingston, Jamaica, West Indies.  Sartain wrote:
    Apropos of this list of artists resident in Philadelphia in 1830 I think it well to insert just here a copy of an interesting letter as yet unpublished, showing who were the artists practicing their profession in this country during the last century. It was written by Charles Wilson (sic) Peale in 1812 to his son Rembrandt, and is dated from Bellafield, October 28. It was given to me by the president of the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Mr. Caleb Cope, who told me that it had been found among the papers of Rembrandt Peale. (Sartain, 1899, p. 146)

Peale’s letter includes this important passage:
    About this time West must have made his beginning, his first essays at portraits were perhaps done at Lancaster and I believe encouraged by the Shippen family. About the same period or a little later young Claypole attempted portrait painting, his father was a house painter and glazer. In 1762 on a visit to Philadelphia, I went to see the paintings of Mr. James Claypole. He was not at home. I saw his pictures and among them one done by Miss Rench, whom, if I mistake not, he married. After her death he intended to go to London to visit Mr West with whom he had been intimate---but meeting with a storm was drove into the West Indies. In the Island of Jamaica he married and settled there. (Sartain, 1899, p. 148)

Later in his letter, Peale continues with:
     Miss Polly Rench, sister to Mrs James Claypole, painted in miniature and had the merit of maintaining her mother and a young brother by the work of her pencil.....(Sartain, 1899, p. 153)

From the evidence to be presented, it will become apparent that Charles Willson Peale knew this branch of the Claypoole family very well indeed. Additionally, other following evidence, from both primary and secondary sources, firmly corroborates the statements of Peale. Given the Claypoole/Peale ties and that both Peale brothers and Claypoole Jr. were portrait painters and limners, it is highly unlikely that Charles W. Peale would misidentify this member of the Claypoole family of Philadelphia. Compelling evidence for the veracity of Charles Willson Peale’s personal knowledge of James Claypoole, Jr. and his father, James Claypoole, Sr., is provided by the following:

•    Firstly, Peale (1741-1827) was a contemporary of both James Claypoole Sr. (1721-1784) and James Claypoole Jr. (c1743-1822). James Claypoole of Jamaica still had 10 years of life in front of him when Peale wrote his 1812 letter to his son, Rembrandt.

•    While there is evidence that James Claypoole, Sr. was apprenticed to Gustavus Hesselius, 1682-1755, the Swedish born painter residing in Philadelphia (Fleischer, 1987, p.18, ref. 15), it is clear that neither portrait nor landscape painting provided the main part of Claypoole Sr.’s income. On August 3rd, 1749, just 15 days after the death of his wife, Rebecca, he advertised in the Pennsylvania Gazette as follows, which suggests he was announcing to the community that, despite his family’s recent bereavement, it was business as usual.

        To be sold very reasonable by James Claypole, in Walnut street, Philadelphia, the following colours for painting, by the hundred weight, or any smaller quantity, viz. White lead, red lead, yellow oker, Venetian red, brown oker, Spanish brown, &c. any of which colours may be had dry or ready ground in oil for use, and putty ready made. The said Claypole has also to sell, a lot of ground, 34 feet front, and 75 feet back, only 95 feet from the South bounds of this city, between the New market and the improvements late of Joseph Scull, Joseph Richards, and sundry others. N.B. He continues as usual his business of all kinds of painting and glazing, such as houses, signs, ships, shew boards, &c. (Pennsylvania Gazette, 1749, Aug. 3rd)

•    Ten years later, on May 31st, 1759, a similar Pennsylvania Gazette advertisement by James Claypoole, Sr. confirmed he was still trading in Walnut Street, Philadelphia.

•    On May 18, 1767, the following advertisement appeared in one of Philadelphia’s German language newspapers: Dienstzeit – Verkaufung. Einer starken, frisch und gesunden Deutschen Dienstmagd ihre Dienstzeit ist zu Verkaufen; sie ist in ihrem Vaterlande zur Bauerarbeit gewohnt gewesen.  Man kan(n) sich ihrentwegen erfudigen bei James Claypoole, in der Walnusse-strasse, zu Philadelphia. (Der Wochentliche Philadelphische Staatsbote, issue: 278, page: 4) 

•    And almost 9 years later again, on March 7th, 1776, we find:
           
ACCOUNT FOR REPAIRING THE OLD GOAL (sic), BY ORDER OF CONGRESS
                         ____________
                                                                                                           March 7th, 1776.
The Continental Congress, to Sundries                                                             DR.
                                                                                 
For work done in preparing the old Jail for the reception of the troops:
 ………………………………………………

To James Claypoole, Glazier:
To 232 sq. Window Glass 8 by 10, 10d  -   -   -                                              £9  13  4
(PA Archives, Series 2, p. 582) 

It will be seen that Peale’s description of James Claypoole, Sr. as a “house painter and glazer” is confirmed by the August 3rd, 1749 Pennsylvania Gazette advertisement and by his supply of window panes for the old Philadelphia gaol in 1775/6.   Additionally, the 1749, 1759 and 1767 advertisements locate James Claypoole, Sr.’s address in Walnut Street (‘Walnusse-strasse’ in German), Philadelphia.
 
•    In 1761, James Claypoole, junior, was also known by Philadelphians to be locatable in/trading from Walnut Street, as on 29th October, the Pennsylvania Gazette announced:
                    
        JUST PUBLISHED. A Perspective View of the PENNSYLVANIA HOSPITAL, with the Buildings intended to be erected. Taken from the South-East, by JAMES CLAYPOOLE, junior, and to be sold by him, in Walnut-Street. Philadelphia; Also by DAVID HALL. Price, One Shilling, plain; or Two, neatly coloured.
 
•    Peale first visited Philadelphia in December 1762 and would have seen James Claypoole, Jr.’s paintings at the Claypoole family business premises/home in Walnut Street. Peale regularly visited Philadelphia until June 1776, when he, wife Rachel and their children left Annapolis, to live permanently in Philadelphia.

•    Of James Claypoole, Jr., Peale wrote:
 
                  ….I saw his pictures and among them one done by Miss Rench, whom, if I mistake not, he married. After her death he intended to go to London to visit Mr West with whom he had been intimate---but meeting with a storm was drove into the West Indies. In the Island of Jamaica he married and settled there.
   
In further confirmation of Peale’s recollections, and his intimate knowledge of the Claypoole family, one finds, in Christ Church, Philadelphia’s baptisms records, the following entry:
 
Jul 11, 1767 – Walter Rench, son of James and Sarah Claypoole, born Apr 28, 1767. Baptised by the Rev. Richard Peters D.D.  (See Appendix II)

Note: Walter Rench Claypoole was named for his maternal grandfather, Captain Walter Rench, ship’s master, who was said to have been lost at sea in late 1764/early 1765 (Welling, 1965, p. 574). Originally from Maryland’s eastern shore, Walter Rench, wife Leah and children moved to (Port) Lewes, Sussex Co., Delaware in 1755 and then to Philadelphia in 1759/1760 (Sussex Co. Deed Book, 1760, p. 299) 

And in the Christ Church burials records:
 
         1767, May 10. Sarah, daughter of James Claypoole, Jun. (See Appendix II)
 
And in St Andrews Parish Register, Kingston, Jamaica:
       
        James Claypoole of the parish of Kingston portrait painter and Helen Frazier of the same parish Spinster were joined together in the holy state of matrimony on the 8th of May 1771.   John Poole Rector of St. Andrew’s. (See Appendix II)
 
•    In 1772, the work Poems on Several Occasions: With Some Other Compositions by Nathaniel Evans, A.M. was printed by John Dunlap in Market Street, Philadelphia. M. DCC. LXXII. The subscribers were mainly from New Jersey, Maryland and Philadelphia, but also listed was “Mr. James Claypoole, Jamaica.” This listing confirms that James Claypoole of Jamaica was a literate and cultured man. (Note: by the late 1770s/early 1780s, John Dunlap’s apprentice, David Chambers Claypoole, had become his business partner.)

•    On 1 September 1777, the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania passed the resolution:

      That the following persons be appointed and authorized to carry into execution the Resolves of Yesterday, respecting the Arresting such persons as are deemed inimical to the cause of American Liberty, Vizt: (followed by the names of 25 men including James Claypoole and Cha’s W. Peale), together with such other persons as they shall call to their assistance. (See Appendix I)

•    On November 14th, 1782, Charles Willson Peale’s younger brother, James, married Mary Claypoole at St Michael’s and Zion Church, Philadelphia (PA Archives, Second Series: p. 389). (Note: all known reference works state that Mary was the daughter of James Claypoole Sr. and his 2nd wife, Mary Chambers Claypoole.)

•    In 1782/83, Charles Willson Peale painted (or he assisted his brother James to paint) the portraits of James’ parents-in-law, James Claypoole, Sr. and Mary Chambers Claypoole (Richardson, 1970, p. 171, ref. 10). (Note: as at 2008, these portraits are owned by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia.)

•    Later, family ties were cemented even further when Peale’s niece, Elizabeth Polk, married Septimus Claypoole, the youngest son of James Claypoole, Sr. and Mary Chambers Claypoole. (see Appendix I)

More supporting evidence for the lineage of the Claypoole family of Philadelphia may be found in James Claypoole, Sr.’s and his son’s close connections with St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Philadelphia, particularily during the ministry of the Rev. William MacClenachan (Appendices I & II). James Claypoole, Sr. left the congregation of Christ Church in 1760 (Barratt, 1917, p. 30), became a founder member of St. Paul's, was a vestryman of St Paul's from 1762 to 1769 (Barratt, 1917, p. 270)  and was buried in St. Paul's Churchyard on Wednesday, 22nd September, 1784 (Pennsylvania Mercury, Sep. 24th).  The 1760 - 1765 tenure of Rev. William MacClenachan as minister of St. Paul's was a time of schism and ill will between Christ Church and St. Paul's (Barratt, 1917, pp. 47-54) and (Gough, 1995, pp. 77-82). Given James Claypoole, Sr.'s commitment to St. Paul's, it is highly unlikely that his son, James Claypoole, Jr., would have married at Christ Church during that period. However, despite James Claypoole senior's relationship with the Rev. Wm. Maclenachan and St. Paul's,  Bracken et al state their candidate for Claypoole Jr., namely James Claypoole, subsequently of Armstrong County, Pa married Lucia/Lucretia Garwood at Christ Church, Philadelphia on March 8, 1763 (Bracken et al, 1971, p. 44). 
     
James Claypoole, Sr. is known to have been born in Philadelphia, lived his life there and to have died in Philadelphia in 1784. We can be confident that he could read and write, as his signature is on a number of surviving documents, he was a tax assessor in 1774, he carried out commissions on behalf of the Continental Congress in 1778 and he was Sheriff of the City of Philadelphia and Philadelphia County from 1777 to 1780.

James Claypoole, Jr., portrait painter and limner, was offering his work for sale as early as 1761, and is known to have signed later paintings, including Memorial to E.R., which was painted in 1774 in Jamaica, West Indies (Richardson, 1970, p. 161).  In 1765 and 1772 respectively, “James Claypoole, Junior” (Beveridge, 1765, pp. viii-ix) and “Mr. James Claypoole, Jamaica” (Evans, 1772, p. xv) subscribed to the printing and purchase of new books. Later, James Claypoole became a coroner and a Commissioner of the Supreme Court, Kingston, Jamaica (see Appendix II). Consequently, we can be certain that he could read and write.

In 1766, James Sr. enrolled his sons, Abraham (George) and David (Chambers) Claypoole, in the Pennsylvania Academy, Philadelphia (Montgomery, 1900, p. 534). Abraham G. Claypoole became an army officer and later, a senior bank officer, which would have required him to be able to read and write. David C. Claypoole became printer to the U.S. Congress and a newspaper proprietor, providing proof that he could read and write too.

Septimus Claypoole became an officer in the Pennsylvania Militia and a partner of his brother David in the American Daily Advertiser, so again it is highly probable he could also read and write (see Appendix I)

This family was also involved in buying and selling land for profit. From the end of the Revolutionary War in 1783 to the mid/late 1790s, the state of Pennsylvania sold tens of thousands of acres of land to enterprising land speculators, who hoped to increase their personal wealth by reselling those lands at a hefty profit (WITF Inc, 2003). During this period, the Claypoole family of Philadelphia was actively involved in obtaining land warrants & selling land in western and northern Pennsylvania - family members applying for/obtaining land warrants included James Sr. (1), his wife Mary (1); his sons Abraham G. (2) – he also received a Revolutionary War grant of 500 acres: David C. (17) and Septimus (1); and his daughters Temperance (1) and Hester (1).
 
Given the evidence above, it is valid to describe James Claypoole, Sr. and his immediate family as literate, cosmopolitan town/city dwellers, primarily involved in commerce, the arts and politics, and influential in Philadelphian society.

There is apparent further evidence of the connection between the Claypoole families of Jamaica and Philadelphia - on April 25, 1788, at Kingston, Jamaica, a son was born to James and Helena Claypoole
(Kingston Parish Register, Vol. 1). They named him Abraham George , undoubtedly in honour of (Captain) Abraham George Claypoole, a Revolutionary War army officer, the eldest son of James Claypoole Sr. and Mary Chambers Claypoole and therefore a (half) brother of James Claypoole Jr.  In 1804, four years after the death of Abraham George 'the younger' (Kingston Parish Register, Vol. 2), Abraham George 'the elder' appears to have visited his brother James as records show A.G. Claypoole arrived at Philadelphia from Kingston, Jamaica on August 11, 1804, on the Ship Hanah (sic) (Philadelphia, 1800-1850, passenger list).
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Section 3

James Claypoole (c.1742-c.1783) farmer of Bedford, Somerset and Armstrong Co's, Pennsylvania, who is unrelated to James Claypoole, Sr. – the evidence.

Far less is known about James Claypoole of Armstrong County, and, despite a great deal of historical and genealogical research, the record appears to be confused as to his true origins (see Appendix III). However, what is known clearly shows that he was a different person from James Claypoole, Jr., discussed above, and that there is no independent evidence of a genealogical link between him and the family of James Claypoole, Sr., of Philadelphia.

It is this James Claypoole, of Armstrong County, whose marriage in 1763 to Lucia/Lucretia Garwood took place at Christ Church, Philadelphia, as discussed earlier, and whom Bracken et al mistakenly identify as James Claypoole, Jr., son of James Claypoole, Sr.

In 1805, James Claypole and his second wife Rachel sold lot no. 3 in Kittanning, Armstrong County to James McClurg, who purchased the land on 27 December 1805. The sale/purchase was recorded on 7 April 1808. This deed is signed James X Claypole (his mark) and Rachel X Claypole (her mark) indicating neither James nor Rachel could write (nor read?). (Lands Deed Book, pp. 259-260) – evidence that he, unlike members of James Claypoole, Sr.’s family, was likely to be illiterate.

Additionally, in contrast with the Claypooles of Philadelphia, James Claypoole, of Bedford, Somerset & Armstrong Co’s, Pennsylvania, was not a land speculator, but a farmer and frontiersman. On November 5th, 1768, representatives of the Six Nations (the Iroquois) signed the Fort Stanwix (now Rome, NY) treaty and ceded a substantial area of Indian lands to the British (represented by Major General Sir William Johnson,  Superintendent of Indian Affairs) for 10,460 pounds, 7 shillings and 3 pence sterling - (Wikipedia – Treaty of Fort Stanwix, 1768) and part of these lands became Bedford County, Pennsylvania. From 3rd April, 1769, public land west of the Allegheny Mountains was opened to settlers, including Bedford County, and on 16th April, 1771, Brothers Valley Township, Bedford Co., Pa. was formed.  As early as 1772, the taxable inhabitants of Brothers Valley Twp. included “James Claypole: 200 acres; 1 improved acre” (Storey, 1907, p. 33).
 
There is evidence from the Somerset County Lands Survey Book, that from 1782, James Claypole improved land which was: Situated one mile south of Castleman River between said river and Negro Mountain, now Elklick Twp., Somerset County and originally surveyed the 21st day of March 1785 in pursuance of a warrant dated 27th day of January 1785 granted to James Claypole for 300 acres including improvements that began the 1st day of March 1782.   (Lands Survey Book, p.86)

In James Claypole of Armstrong County descendants’ 19th and 20th century ‘biographies’, he is remembered by grandson, David H. Claypoole as:
       His paternal grandfather, James Claypoole, was born in England and came to Pennsylvania, where he settled in Kittanning township, this county, from which he was driven by the Indians. He was a farmer, married and had eight children. (Wiley,  1891, pp. 589-590)
 
And by his greatgrandson, James E. Claypoole:
      James Claypoole was born near Philadelphia, Pa., and at a very early day endeavored to establish a home in Manor Township, Armstrong county, but was driven away by the Indians. Some years afterward he returned to Manor township and was one of the early settlers, seeing much hardship but successfully defending himself and family from further Indian attacks. (Beers & Co., 1914, pp. 914-915)

At the present time, there is not a great deal more known about James Claypoole of Bedford, Somerset and Armstrong Co’s, though a significant amount of what is known has been summarised in Appendix III to this paper.  In stark contrast, a well documented history and genealogy of James Claypoole, Jr., of Philadelphia and Jamaica, is cited in the Appendix II to this paper.
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Section 4


Conclusion: making the case for the identity of James Claypoole Jr.


The reader must judge on the basis of the evidence presented, as to the correct identity of James Claypoole, Jr., the son of James Claypoole, Sr., 1721-1784, of Philadelphia, son of Rebecca White Claypoole, c1721-1749, and stepson of Mary Chambers Claypoole.

Was it the James Claypoole described by Charles Willson Peale, 1741-1827, a fellow portrait painter, a contemporary of both Claypooles, a visitor to Philadelphia from 1762 and resident there from 1776, who was related by two marriages to this Claypoole family, who was politically aligned with James Claypoole, Sr. during the Revolutionary War, and who recorded his living memories of these Claypooles in his 1812 letter to his son, Rembrandt?

Or was it the James Claypoole described by Evelyn Claypoole Bracken, 1909-2004, high school and college instructor, resident of Indiana Co., Pennsylvania, and descendant of James and Lucia/Lucretia Claypoole of Armstrong Co., Pennsylvania, and her collaborators, who compiled the genealogy for The Claypool(e) Family in America and self published it in 1971?

The following list of cited references, and Appendices I, II and III which contain more supporting historical evidence about the life and times of James Claypoole, Sr., James Claypoole, Jr., and James Claypoole of Armstrong County, should assist the reader to decide whose version is more credible.
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Section 5

References cited in the text

Barratt, Norris Stanley (1917)  Outline of The History of Old St. Paul’s Church, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1760-1898 The Colonial Society of Pennsylvania Philadelphia.

Beers, J.H. & Co. (1914)     Armstrong County, Pa., Her People, Past and Present Transcribed February 1999 by Nanci Michalkiewicz for the Armstrong County Beers Project and published 1999 by the Armstrong County Pennsylvania Genealogy Project.

Beveridge, J. (1765). Epistolae familiares et alia quaedam miscellanea. Familiar epistles, and other miscellaneous pieces. Philadelphia: Printed for the Author by William Bradford, at the London Coffee House, at the corner of Market and Front Streets.

Bracken, E.C., Claypool, E.P., Claypool, W.L. (1971) The Claypool(e) Family in America, self published (E.C. Bracken). Indiana Co., PA, USA

Evans, Nathaniel A.M. (1772) Poems on Several Occasions: With Some Other Compositions. Philadelphia. Printed by John Dunlap in Market-Street, M. DCC. LXXII.

Fleischer, Roland E. (1987) GUSTAVUS HESSELLIUS AND PENN FAMILY PORTRAITS: A Conflict Between Visual and Documentary Evidence. American Art Journal, Vol. 19, No. 3 (Summer 1987) pp. 4-18.

Gough, Deborah Matthias (1995) Christ Church, Philadelphia The Nation’s Church in a Changing City The Barra Foundation University of Pennsylvania Press Philadelphia, USA

Graff, Rebecca Irwin (1893) Genealogy of the Claypoole Family of Philadelphia 1588-1893.  J.B. Lippincott Company, Philadelphia, USA

Kingston Parish Register, Vol. 1, page 363 (1788) - FHL film 1291273; Church of Jesus Christ and Latter Day Saints, Salt Lake City, UT, USA

Kingston Parish Register, Vol. 2, folio 235 (1800) - FHL film 1291273; Church of Jesus Christ and Latter Day Saints, Salt Lake City, UT, USA

Lands Deed Book, Vol. 9, pp. 259, 260, Armstrong County Court House, PA, USA

Lands Survey Book, Vol. 2, p. 86, Somerset County Court House, PA, USA

Montgomery, Thomas Harrison (1900) A History of the University of Pennsylvania: From its Foundation to A.D. 1770 George W. Jacobs & Co., 103-105 South 15th Street, Philadelphia, USA

Pennsylvania Archives (1776) Series: 2, Volume: 1, Chapter: Papers Referring to the War of the Revolution, 1775-1777 p. 582

Pennsylvania Archives. Second Series. Vol. IX., 1880. Marriage Record of St. Michael’s and Zion Church, Philadelphia 1745-1800  p. 389

Philadelphia, 1800-1850, Passenger and Immigration Lists accessed via Ancestry.com on April 30, 2008.

Richardson, E.P. (1970) JAMES CLAYPOOLE, JUNIOR, RE-DISCOVERED, Art Quarterly, Vol 33, No.2 (Summer 1970), pp. 159-175.

Sartain, John (1899) Reminiscences of a Very Old Man, 1808-1897. D. Appleton and company, New York, USA

Storey, Henry Wilson (1907) History of Cambria County Pennsylvania: With Genealogical Memoirs Vol. 1 The Lewis Publishing Company. New York. Chicago.

Sussex County, Delaware - Deed Book I, p. 299. Delaware Archives, Dover, DE

Welling, Jane Betsey (1965) They were here too: Genealogies of the owners of the Inn at Easton Corners and related families of Southern Washington County, and environs New York University of Michigan, Lansing, MI, USA (Note: Emeritus Professor Welling was the former Professor of Art Education, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan)

Wikipedia  - Treaty of Fort Stanwix, 1768 - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Fort_Stanwix - accessed on February 3, 2008.

Wiley, Samuel T. (1891) Historian And Editor. Biographical And Historical Cyclopedia Of Indiana And Armstrong Counties, Pennsylvania.  John M. Gresham & Co., 1218-1220 Filbert Street, Philadelphia, Pa, USA

WITF Inc (2003) The American Revolution, 1765-1783, Chap. 4, The Border Wars. para. 10  http://www.explorepahistory.com/story.php?storyId=20&chapter=5 - accessed on February 3, 2008
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Appendix I

Timeline for James Claypoole, Sr. (1721-1784), painter, glazier, merchant and Sheriff of Philadelphia City and County, 1777-1780, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

(Note: it is necessary ‘convert’ pre Sep. 1752 recorded dates, due to the calendar change from Julian to Gregorian in Great Britain and Dominions, which included British America, now the USA and Canada.  In the changeover, September 2, 1752 was followed by September 14, 1752 and the first day of the first month of 1753 moved to January 1 from March 25.)

January 22, 1720 (Julian)/February 2, 1721(Gregorian)
James, son of Joseph and Edith Claypoole, was born on January 22, 1720 (Julian calendar) and was baptised on February 5, 1721 (Julian) at Christ Church, Philadelphia by the Rev. John Vicary. (Transcribed Christ Church baptisms register, 1709-1768)
 
1741 - James Claypoole was working for/apprenticed to Gustavus Hesselius, as shown by a “Receipted bill of Thomas Penn. August 19, 1741. Penn Papers, Society Collection, The Historical Society of Pennsylvania. The back of this bill reveals that Gustavus Hesselius had done painting at Springettsbury and that James Claypoole was sent to collect the payment for his ‘Master Gustavus Hesselius’.”  Fleischer, Roland E., (1987) GUSTAVUS HESSELLIUS AND PENN FAMILY PORTRAITS: A Conflict Between Visual and Documentary Evidence. American Art Journal, Vol. 19, No. 3 (Summer 1987) pp. 4-18.

May 24, 1742
James Claypoole married Rebecca White (daughter of Joseph White and Mary Heulings White of Burlington, New Jersey) at Christ Church, Philadelphia. (Transcribed Christ Church marriage register, 1709-1800)

November 18, 1742. Pennsylvania Gazette
To be SOLD, A Likely Negro Woman, about 25 Years of Age, fit for Town or Country; by James Claypoole, in Walnut Street, Philadelphia.

c1743 – James Claypoole, Jr., son of James and Rebecca Claypoole, probably born in Philadelphia, Pa.  (Note: no primary record of birth or baptism found as at January 2008.)
Note:  “I Joseph White Junior of the City and County of Burlington in the Western District of New Jersey…………..I Give, Devise and Bequeath unto my Nephew James Claypole the Son of James and Rebecca Claypole the Sum of Five pounds current money as aforesaid to be paid by the Executors hereafter names as Soon as Conveniently they Can after my Desease dated this eighth Day of August 1754.” Will proved Dec 2, 1754. Other beneficiaries: Sister Mary Bryan and nephew Joseph Claypole. Witnesses: Isaac Heulings, Elizabeth Elton, William Heulings. (New Jersey Wills, 1670-1760, Lib. 8, p.184)

Before May 3, 1744 (date of will being proved)
Joseph Claypoole, father of James Claypoole, Sr., died at Philadelphia. Joseph was interred in Christ Church Burial Ground. (Note: as at February 2008, awaiting date of burial information from Christ Church Preservation Trust)
 
August 2, 1744. Pennsylvania Gazette
To be SOLD, by JAMES CLAYPOOLE, in Walnut Street, PHILADELPHIA; A Tract of Land, in Wright's Town, Bucks County, containing about 200 Acres: Also a Lot of Ground in Philadelphia, containing 20 Feet front; on the South Side of Walnut street.

1745 - Release of property, dated 7 Nov. 1745, recorded 12 June 1766. Between James Claypoole, of the city of Philadelphia, Painter and David Chambers of said city, Shopkeeper and Edith his wife. It mentions James and Edith as residuary devisees of their father Joseph Claypoole, dec. (See relevant 1766 entry) (Deed Book No. 1, page 601, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA.)
 
1747 - PENNSYLVANIA ARCHIVES SECOND SERIES Vol II (extract)
In December, 1747, the Assembly having made no provision for the defence of the City and Province, many of the inhabitants became alarmed and voluntarily entered into an association for defence. Companies were formed, which proceeded to choose officers, who, in turn, assembled and chose their superior officers, all being commissioned by the direction of the Provincial Council.
OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATED REGIMENT OF FOOT OF PHILADELPHIA –
December 29, 1747
Colonel: Abraham Taylor, Lieut. Colonel: Thomas Lawrence, Major: Samuel McCall. Captain: John Inglis, Lieut: Lyndford Lardner, Ensign: Thomas Lawrence, Jun. Captain: John Ross, Lieut: Richard Swan, Ensign: Philip Benezet. Captain: James Polegreen, Lieut: William Bradford, Ensign: William Bingham. Captain: Charles Willing, Lieut: Atwood Shute, Ensign: James Claypoole. Captain: William Cuzzins, Lieut: George Spafford, Ensign: Abraham Mason......(See also PA Archives, Series: Colonial Records, Volume: V, Chap: Minutes of the Provincial Council  pp. 172, 174.)

July 19, 1749.
Rebecca White Claypoole, wife of James Claypoole, died. "LXXVI. In Memory of/REBECCA the wife of/James Claypoole/who departed this Life ye 19th/of July 1749 Aged 28 years." (Philadelphia – Tombstone Inscriptions from Christ Church. www.ancestry.com, accessed January 2008.)

August 3, 1749. Pennsylvania Gazette
To be sold very reasonable by James Claypole, in Walnut street, Philadelphia, the following colours for painting, by the hundred weight, or any smaller quantity, viz. White lead, red lead, yellow oker, Venetian red, brown oker, Spanish brown, &c. any of which colours may be had dry or ready ground in oil for use, and putty ready made. The said Claypole has also to sell, a lot of ground, 34 feet front, and 75 feet back, only 95 feet from the South bounds of this city, between the New market and the improvements late of Joseph Scull, Joseph Richards, and sundry others.  N.B. He continues as usual his business of all kinds of painting and glazing, such as houses, signs, ships, shew boards, &c.

January 16, 1750. Pennsylvania Gazette
Very good English sash window glass, 8 by 10, to be sold cheap by James Claypoole, in Walnut street, Philadelphia, by the box, half box, or any number of single lights. Also the following colours for painting, viz. White lead, ground in oil, or dry, yellow oker, brown oker, Spanish brown, venetian red umber, &c. by the cask, hundred weight, or any smaller quantity.  N.B He continues his usual business of all kinds of painting, gilding, glazing, &c.

May 17, 1750. Pennsylvania Gazette
Just imported, and to be sold by JAMES CLAYPOOLE, In Walnut street, Philadelphia, the following colours, brushes, &c. for painting; White lead, vermilion, Spanish white, Prussian blue, lake, brown pink [?], terra vert, yellow pink, verdigrease, sugar of lead, distill'd verdigrease, white copperas, Spanish brown, Venetian red, red lead, brown oker, yellow oker, umber, ivory black, best gold leaf, Dutch metal ditto, silver leaf, best hard varnish, brushes of all sorts, camel's hair pencils, of all sizes, Black Fisher's ditto, Also English sash window glass. Said Claypoole has to sell a house and lot of ground, on Second street, continued southward beyond the city, with the conveniency of a well of excellent water: A lot on Duck street, near the New market, containing 34 feet front, and 75 deep. Also a lot in Walnut street, joining his dwelling house. N.B. He continues his business of painting, gilding, glasing, &c.

September, 1750.
James Claypoole received a licence to marry Mary Chambers. Note: Mary was probably a sister of James' brother in law, David Chambers, who married Edith Claypoole. (Pennsylvania Marriage Licenses issued by Governor James Hamilton, 1748-1752 Pennsylvania Vital Records, Vol. I, accessed via www.ancestry.com on 1 April, 2008)

July 17, 1751.
Elizabeth, daughter of James and Mary Claypoole was born July 17, 1751 and was baptised on August 20, 1753 at Christ Church by the Rev. Robert Jenney L.L.D. (Transcribed Christ Church baptisms register, 1709-1768 - baptised with Mary, her sister)

September 12, 1751. Pennsylvania Gazette
To the Freeholders of the City and County of Philadelphia.
GENTLEMEN,
AS the present Coroner declines serving, I have taken the liberty of this publick method, to acquaint you, that I intend to stand a candidate for that Office, and to request your votes and interest, which favour will very much oblige your humble servant.
JAMES CLAYPOOLE.

1752 – The Pennsylvania Provincial Assembly - Votes of Assembly
……   A Petition from James Claypoole, of the City of Philadelphia, praying to be nominated the Officer for measuring of Timber and Plank, if the House should pass the Bill now before them for that Purpose: was presented to the House and read, and Ordered to lie on the Table.
Then the House adjourned to next Second-day at Three o’clock P.M.
(Pennsylvania Archives, Series: 8; Volume: IV; page 3497.)

July 27, 1753
Mary, daughter of James and Mary Claypoole was born July 27, 1753 and was baptised on August 20, 1753 at Christ Church by the Rev. Robert Jenney L.L.D. (Transcribed Christ Church baptisms register, 1709-1768 - baptised with Elizabeth, her sister)
 
c1755
Abraham George, son of James and Mary Claypoole was born c1755. (Note: no primary record of birth or baptism found as at January 2008.)

May 29, 1755. PennsylvaniaGazette
In Pursuance of an ACT of ASSEMBLY, intitled, An Act to encourage the Establishing of an Hospital for the Relief of the Sick Poor of this province, and for the Reception and Cure of Lunaticks, the following LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS thereto, from the Beginning to this Time, is now published.
(Listed by name, in alphabetic order, A – Z)
C
Joshua Crosby, Thomas Cadwallader, Thomas Crosby, John Coates, John Campbell, Samuel Caruthers, David Chambers, William Chancellor, James Chattin, Samuel Cheesman, James Child, John Church, William Clampsser, William Clark, Matthew Clarkson, James Claypoole, William Clemm, James Clewlow, Thomas Clifford, Henry Clifton, Matthias Cline, Warwick Coates, John Coates, junior, Thomas Coates, junior, William Coleman, William Cooper, Jacob Cooper, James Coultas, Joseph Cox, Moses Cox, William Craddock, John Cresson, Robert Cross, Matthias Culpt.
…………………………….

December 25, 1755. Pennsylvania Gazette
On Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday last, great Numbers of the Inhabitants of this City met together legally, and chose, by Ballot, a Captain, Lieutenant and Ensign, for their respective Wards; and have drawn up proper Certificates of their Elections, to be presented to his Honour our Governor for his Approbation. And we can assure the Publick, that the excellent Spirit of Association, and learning the military Discipline, which so generally prevailed amongst us in the late War, and was, under the Blessing of Providence, our Security and Preservation at that Time, is now revived; and that we are determined, as soon as we have Officers duly commissioned, to join Heart and Hand for our mutual Security and Preservations. And if the same prudent and manly Steps are speedily taken in all the numerous Townships of this Province, we may reasonably hope soon to become the Terror of our Enemies, and shortly to put an End to the cruel and savage Barbarities, which are committing on our poor Back Inhabitants, to the great Affliction of every benevolent Mind. 'Tis therefore to be hoped, this good and necessary Work will be generally fallen into by the People; and that our future Contentions shall only be, who shall be forwardest, and who shall do most, for the Defence of his Country, for the Relief of the Distressed, and the Preservation of every Thing that is valuable and dear to Freemen.
The Gentlemen chosen for Officers are as follows, viz.
CAPTAINS.
Mr. John Sayre, Mr. Daniel Roberdeau, Mr. William Bradford, Mr. George Okill, Mr. Thomas Bourne, Dr. John Diemer, Mr. William Grant, and John Lawrence, Esq;
LIEUTENANTS.
Mr. Plunket Fleeson, Mr. Thomas Willing, Mr. Daniel Rundle, Mr. Thomas Smith, Mr. Matthew Clarkson, Mr. George Brooks, Mr. John Groves, and Mr. Henry Keppele.
ENSIGNS.
Mr. Andrew Bankson, Mr. James Claypoole, Mr. John Rhea, Mr. George Bryan, Mr. Josiah Davenport, Mr. William Clampffer, Mr. Buckridge Sims, and Dr. Thomas Lloyd.

1756 – Taxables in the City of Philadelphia
Dock Ward. Claypoole, James, Painter   £36
(Colonial Philadelphians by Hannah Benner Roach, 1999, Published by The Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. p.113)

June 14, 1757
David (Chambers), son of James and Mary Claypoole was born June 14, 1757 and was baptised on July 28, 1757 at Christ Church by the Rev. Robert Jenney L.L.D. (Transcribed Christ Church baptisms register, 1709-1768)

 March 22, 1759. The Pennsylvania Gazette
ALL Persons indebted to the Estate of DAVID CHAMBERS, Stonecutter, of the City of Philadelphia, deceased, are requested to make Payment; and those that have any Accounts against the said Estate, to bring them in, that they may be adjusted by EDITH CHAMBERS, Executrix, ALEXANDER CHAMBERS, and JOSEPH HALL, Executors.

May 31, 1759. The Pennsylvania Gazette
Just imported, and to be sold by JAMES CLAYPOOLE, In Walnut street, Philadelphia, BRISTOL crown glass, 8 by 10, 9 by 12, in boxes or by the light, white lead, yellow oaker, Spanish brown, Prussian blue, verdigrease, strewing smalt, vermilion, lake, brown pink, yellow pink, rose pink, and other colours, either ground or ready for use, or dry, hard, white and brown varnishes and lacquers, best gold leaf, Dutch metal ditto; all sorts of brushes, camel hair, and other pencils; also London and Bristol crown glass, in sheets or cut, and fitted for clocks, samplers, beausets, pictures, &c. curious metzotinto pictures of the king of Prussia, and William Pitt, Esq; secretary of state; taken from original paintings. N.B. Painting, gilding and glasing done by said Claypoole, as usual.

June 12, 1759
Temperance, daughter of James and Mary Claypoole was born June 12, 1759 and was baptised on October 21, 1759 at Christ Church by the Rev. Robert Jenney L.L.D. (Transcribed Christ Church baptisms register, 1709-1768)

Note: In 1760, the congregation of Christ Church in Philadelphia suffered a schism. The minister, vestry, and church wardens of Christ Church (supported by the Bishop of London, England) dismissed William McClenachan from his position as an assistant minister and refused to give a hearing to him in order to allow a defence to the "private" charges brought against him. Part of the congregation was devoted to Rev. McClenachan and, breaking away, established St. Paul's Church for him. Rev. McClenachan, who came from a Scots Irish Presbyterian background, was an adherent and friend of George Whitefield, who, with John Wesley and others of Oxford University’s ‘Holy Club’, was in the reforming vanguard of the Anglican Church. However, Whitefield parted company with Wesley over the doctrine of predestination for Whitefield was a follower of Calvin in this respect. Whitefield spent 1738/39 as the parish priest at Savannah, Georgia and travelled to and from the United Kingdom and America on many occasions.  In the first half of the 1760’s, he preached at St. Paul’s, Philadelphia several times, preaching from a Calvinist theology. He was known for his powerful voice and his ability to appeal to the emotions of a crowd, and unlike most preachers of his time spoke extemporaneously, rather than reading his sermon from notes. Whitefield's more democratic speaking style was greatly appealing to the American audience. Benjamin Franklin once attended a revival meeting in Philadelphia and was greatly impressed with Whitfield’s ability to deliver a message to such a large audience. James Claypoole, Sr. and his immediate family were strong supporters of the Rev. William McClenachan and the reforming/evangelistic movement within the Anglican/Episcopal Church.

June 24, 1760
The Articles of Agreement, Constitution and concessions of "The Episcopal Church of St. Paul", having been drawn by lawyer, John Ross, Esquire, were signed by 97 individuals, including many prominent members of Philadelphia's society - one signatory was "Jas Claypoole".  The fifth article stated "That a vestry of twenty persons should be elected".  Barratt, Norris Stanley (1917)  Outline of The History of Old St. Paul’s Church, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1760-1898. The Colonial Society of Pennsylvania Philadelphia.

January 29, 1761. Pennsylvania Gazette
AS a new Church, called St. PAULCHURCH has been thought necessary, for the Worship of ALMIGHTY GOD, to be erected in this City, by many well disposed Christians; who have, according to their Abilities, chearfully subscribed, and many of them paid considerable Sums of Money, towards carrying on this Pious Work. In Consequence whereof, a very large and commodious Building hath been begun, and carried on to the full Height of the Brick Work: But it being judged that the Expence of completing and finishing this Church will greatly exceed the Sums subscribed; therefore it is thought expedient to set up a LOTTERY, for the raising 3000 Pieces of Eight, which it is hoped will compleatly finish the said Church; and not doubted but all well Wishers to the true Worship of GOD, will favour and encourage this Undertaking.................................
The following Gentlemen are appointed Managers, viz. Walter Goodman, Thomas Campbell, John Ord, Plunket Fleeson, Ephraim Bonham, Andrew Bankson, Andrew Doz, Thomas Charlton, James Stevenson, John Young, James Claypoole, and Robert Towers; who are to give Bond, and be upon Oath, that they will truly execute the Trust in them reposed. Tickets are now selling by the said Managers, at their respective Dwelling houses, William Bradford, at the London Coffee House, and David Hall, at the New Printing Office, in Market street...........................

1761-1763
Hester, daughter of James and Mary Claypoole was born c1762. (Note: no primary record of birth or baptism found as at January 2008, but it is likely she was baptised at St. Paul’s Church, Philadelphia by the Rev. William McClenachan)

September 13, 1761
St Paul’s vestry voted to engage James Claypoole to provide the mohogany(sic) pulpit for the new church. Richardson, E. P. (1970) JAMES CLAYPOOLE, JUNIOR, RE-DISCOVERED, Art Quarterly, Vol. 33, No. 2, page 161.

October 21, 1762. Pennsylvania Gazette
TO BE SOLD, AN undivided Right, consisting of three Fifths of a House and Lot, on the North Side of Walnut street, between Front and Second street, containing 22 Feet front, and 51 Feet deep, the House 20 Feet front, besides the Privilege of a 4 Feet Alley, and 24 Feet front above the Alley, and 29 Feet and an Half back, having a good Brick Kitchen two Stories high, wherein are two Ovens. For further Particulars enquire of James Claypoole, in Walnut street, or David and William Chambers, in Arch street. (Note: David  and William Chambers were sons of David (Sr.) and Edith Chambers and therefore nephews of James Claypoole, Sr.)

1762-1769
James Claypoole, Vestryman, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Philadelphia (Note: the vestry included Andrew Doz (1762-1764), father of Rebecca and Martha, whose portraits were painted by James Claypoole, Jr. – see Appendix II). Outline of The History of Old St. Paul's Church, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1760 -1898 by (Judge) Norris Stanley Barratt. Publisher: The Colonial Society of Pennsylvania, 1917.

1763-1765
Septimus, son of James and Mary Claypoole was born c1764. (Note: no formal record of birth or baptism found as at January 2008, but it is likely he was baptised at St. Paul’s Church, Philadelphia by the Rev. William McClenachan)

1766 - Enrolments at the University of Pennsylvania, Academy and College.
            List of Scholars Entered at the Academy and College up to and including the year
            1769…

            1766 - Claypoole, Abraham (George). Claypoole, David. Enrolled by James
            Claypoole.

A History of the University of Pennsylvania: From its Foundation to A.D. 1770 (1900) Montgomery, Thomas Harrison. George W. Jacobs & Co., 103-105 South 15th Street, Philadelphia, USA.

1766 – A Bucks County, Pennsylvania deed, recorded 12 June 1766, is for the release of property of James Claypoole of Phil., Painter, David Chambers of said city shopkeeper and Edith his wife to Samuel Faries. James and Edith being the residuary devisees of the last will and testament of their father Joseph Claypoole dec. It goes on to say William Penn granted 5,000 acres of land to be located in this province to James Claypoole their Grandfather. and by his warrant dated  12 May 1684 caused to be surveyed 1,000 acres of Bucks Co. land on 30 July 30 1684. (See relevant 1745 entry)

August 3, 1766
“The Reverend William Macclenachan Recttor of Worcester Parresh departed this Life the 3rd day of August Anno 1766”  (Transcribed register of St. Martin’s Protestant Episcopal Church, Showell, Worcester Co., Maryland. -  www.snjgg.com  accessed 22 January, 2008.)
 
September 18, 1766, The Pennsylvania Gazette.
Epitaph on the Reverend Mr. WILLIAM McCLENACHAN, late Minister of St. Paul, Philadelphia.  ‘WHILST othis modest Stone Religion weeps. Beneath a generous, fearless Christian sleeps; Rests from the PreacherCharge, his envied Part, Labours of Love, and Virtues of the Heart: Who owned, as well taught from Truthfair Rays, No other Guide, nor wishfor other Praise:  Who, Friend to Man, and Foe to Vice alone, Livfor our Bliss, and dyto crown his own.’

May 18, 1767 - Der Wochentliche Philadelphische Staatsbote (Issue: 278; Page: 4)
'Dienstzeit – Verkaufung. Einer starken, frisch und gesunden Deutschen Dienstmagd ihre Dienstzeit ist zu Verkaufen; sie ist in ihrem Vaterlande zur Bauerarbeit gewohnt gewesen.  Man kan(n) sich ihrentwegen erfudigen bei James Claypoole, in der Walnusse-strasse, zu Philadelphia.'
 
1769 – PROPRIETARY TAX, CITY OF PHILADELPHIA – 1769
            Dock Ward – Joseph Allen, Assessor.
                                                       Acres    Horses    Cattle    Servants        Tax
James Claypoole                              -            -              -              -           £83 .2 .9
(Pennsylvania Archives, Series: 3; Volume: XIV; page 171)
(Note: James Claypoole, Sr. is tax assessed in Dock Ward – is he already living in Spruce Street, as recorded in his letter of  14th June, 1780?)

September 15, 1773. PennsylvaniaGazette
To the FREEHOLDERS, and others, ELECTORS for the City and County of PHILADELPHIA,
GENTLEMEN, I TAKE the Liberty, by this Method, to offer myself a Candidate for the CoronerOffice, and request the Favour of your Votes and Interest, at the ensuing Election, which shall be gratefully acknowledged by, your humble Servant,
JAMES CLAYPOOLE.

1774 – PROVINCIAL TAX, CITY OF PHILADELPHIA - 1774
             Dock Ward - James Claypoole, Assessor.
…………………………….           Acres    Horses    Cattle    Servants        Tax
 James Claypoole, painter                  -             -           1             -          £46 .18 .8
(Pennsylvania Archives, Series: 3; Volume: XIV; page 223)

November 19, 1774
Elizabeth Claypoole, daughter of James and Mary Claypoole, married (Capt.) Norris Copper at St. Paul’s, Philadelphia. (Pennsylvania Archives. Second Series. Vol. IX., 1880. Marriage Record of St. Paul's Church, Philadelphia. 1759-1806; pp 441-494.)

1775 - "Capt: Copper (married J. Claypole's Daugh'r)"  Roach, Hannah Benner (1999) Colonial Philadelphians ('Genealogical Gleanings from from Dr. Rush's Ledger A') The Genealogical Society Of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia page: 176"

March 7, 1776
ACCOUNT FOR REPAIRING THE OLD GOAL (sic), BY ORDER OF CONGRESS
____________
                                                                                                             March 7th, 1776.
                          The Continental Congress, to Sundries,                                  DR.
For work done in preparing the old Jail for the reception of the troops:
…………………………………………………………………………
To James Claypoole, Glazier:
       To 232 sq. Window Glass, 8 by 10, 10d      -           -            -             £9    13    4
(Pennsylvania Archives, Series 2, Volume 1, Chapter: Papers Referring to the War of the Revolution, 1775-1777; page 582) 

October 30, 1776. The Pennsylvania Gazette
To the FREEHOLDERS and FREEMEN of the City and County of PHILADELPHIA. GENTLEMEN, AS the Sheriffoffice is now vacant, I take this method to inform you that I offer myself as a candidate for that office, and request your votes at the ensuing election, which favour shall be held in grateful remembrance, by, Your humble servant,
JAMES CLAYPOOLE.

November 5, 1776
ELECTION RETURNS – PHILADELPHIA CITY
Sheriffs:                                                                           (Total votes)
               William Masters,……………………………………..278 (1)
                Isaac Coats,…………………………………………..188 (2)
                Jas. Claypool, ………………………………………..173 (3)
plus six other candidates, only one of whom received a vote of three figures.
(Pennsylvania Archives, Series: 6; Volume: XI; page: 315) 
                                                                  

February 26, 1777, Pennsylvania Gazette
At the election held at the State House last Friday the following gentlemen were chosen, viz.  Assembly: William Jackson, William Hollingshead. Counsellor: George Bryan. County Commissioners: Isaac Snowden, Jacob Bright, John Williams. Street Commissioners: Isaac Howell, John McCalla. City Assessors: Andrew Tybout, Frederick Kuhl, Samuel Wheeler, Joseph Wetherill, William Young, Robert Smith. Wardens: Benjamin Paschall, William Colliday. City Commissioners: James Claypoole, Philip Boehm, William Shute, Robert Curry, Jacob Laughlin, Isaac Coates.

1777                        MINUTES OF THE NAVY BOARD
                                                                                    State Navy Board,
                                                                                                           June 26th, 1777.
PRESENT:
                              William Bradford, C.M. …………………Paul Cox
                               Joseph Blewer, …………………………Joseph Marsh, (on duty,)
                                                                   Manuel Eyre.

An order on William Webb to James Claypole, for One pound two shillings
and sixpence, for three squares of Glass and stopping in the Lighthouse, for
the Ship Montgomery, £1 2 6.
(Pennsylvania Archives, Series: 2, Volume: 1, pages 177 & 178.)
                                                                  
August 18, 1777. Pennsylvania Gazette
Philadelphia, ss.
IN Pursuance of a Precept of the Justices to me directed, Notice is hereby given, That a County Court of General Quarter Sessions of the Peace will be held at the State House, in the City of Philadelphia, on Monday, the first Day of September next, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon of the said Day; whereof all Coroners, Keepers of Prisons and Houses of Correction, Constables and Bailiffs, &c. of the said County, are to take Notice and attend accordingly. And on Wednesday, the third Day of September aforesaid, at the Place aforesaid, will be opened, the Court of Common Pleas for said County. JAMES CLAYPOOLE, Sheriff.

1777             MINUTES OF THE SUPREME EXECUTIVE COUNCIL
The Council met.
                                                                                PHILAD’A, Sunday Aug. 31, 1777.

PRESENT:
His Excell’y THO’S WHARTON, jun’r, Esq’r, President
Hon'ble GEORGE BRYAN, Esq'r, Vice President
John Bailey                John Proctor, &) Esq’rs
Jonathan Hoge           Joseph Hart       )

…..the following resolution was thereupon made, Viz’t:
WHEREAS, the Congress of the Thirteen United States of North America have by their Resolves of the 21st inst., recommended to the Executive Powers of the several States to apprehend & secure all persons who have in their General conduct & conversation evidenced a disposition inimical to the Cause of America, particularily………………….
    And whereas, it is necessary for the Public safety of this time, when a British Army is landed in Maryland, with a professed design of enslaveing this free Country, & is now advanceing towards this City, as a principal object of hostility, that such dangerous persons be accordingly secured; therefore,
    Resolved, That a suitable number of the friends to the Public cause be authorized forthwith to seize and Secure the Persons of the said (followed by the names of 42 men including Tho’s Wharton Sr., Anglican Ministers and Quaker leaders)………………….
You may perceive that Council would not without necessity commit many of the persons to the Common Goal, (sic) nor even to the State Prison…………….

The Council met.
                                                                             PHILAD’A, Monday Septem. 1, 1777.

PRESENT:
His Excell’y THO’S WHARTON, jun’r, Esq’r, President
Hon'ble GEORGE BRYAN, Esq'r, Vice President
John Bailey                John Proctor, &) Esq’rs
Jonathan Hoge           Joseph Hart       )
…………………………………………………………………
    Resolved, That the following persons be appointed and authorized to carry into execution the Resolves of Yesterday, respecting the Arresting such persons as are deemed inimical to the cause of American Liberty, Vizt: (followed by the names of 25 men including James Claypoole and Cha’s W. Peale), together with such other persons as they shall call to their assistance.
     NOTE --- That the foregoing Resolution (with those before relating to this Business) was signed by the Hon’ble George Bryan, Esq’r, Vice President.
(Pennsylvania Archives, Series: Colonial Records; Volume: XI; pages 283, 284 and 286)
 
September 3, 1777. The Pennsylvania Gazette
To the free and independent ELECTORS of the City and County of PHILADELPHIA.
GENTLEMEN, I HEARTILY thank you for the large number of votes you favoured me with for the SheriffOffice at our last general election, although I was late in my application; and as I again offer myself a candidate for said office, have taken this usual method to request your votes at the next election in favour of Your obedient humble servant, JAMES CLAYPOOLE.

September 26, 1777 - British troops under Gen. Howe occupy Philadelphia. The Continental Congress relocates to York Town, Pennsylvania.

1777 – 1784: According to Charles Coleman Sellers, Charles Willson Peale's descendant and biographer, Peale and James Claypoole, Sr. knew each other well: "The elder James Claypoole served with him (Peale) on the committee of 1777 appointed to deal with disloyal citizens of the town (Note: See Sept.1, 1777, above) , and in 1782, Claypoole's daughter, Mary, married James Peale (CWP's brother). Another relative, Septimus Claypoole, (James Sr.'s youngest son) married Charles Willson Peale's  adopted daughter, Elizabeth Polk. ...... In the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts there is a portrait of him (James Sr) which can be dated between the Peale-Claypoole alliance in 1782 and his death in 1784. It is probably by Charles Willson Peale - possibly by James (Peale) assisted by his brother." Sellers, Charles Coleman (1969) Charles Willson Peale Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, USA. (Note:other family links: James Claypoole, Sr. was Sheriff of Philadelphia from 1777 to 1780, and a revolutionary 'patriot', who went to York Town in 1777/78, when the British army occupied Philadelphia. He was known by Dr. Benjamin Rush of Philadelphia (Roach, 1999, p. 176) signatory to the Declaration of Independence - in November, 1777, Dr. Rush’s brother Jacob married Mary 'Polly' Rench, who in turn was sister to Sarah Rench, first wife of James Claypoole, Jr.)

February 7, 1778. Pennsylvania Gazette
Just published, and to be sold by JOHN DUNLAP, in QUEEN STREET, LANCASTER, FATHER ABRAHAM'S POCKET ALMANACK, For the YEAR 1778, Being the Third Year of the Independence of America. Fitted to the use of Pennsylvania and the adjacent States. Containing (besides many useful lists, &c.) The Articles of CONFEDERATION and PERPETUAL UNION of the United states of America, as proposed by Congress to the Legislatures of the different States.
This great Confederacy is so intimately connected with the freedom, Happiness and Independence of the People of America, that no person can hold a proper rank in society, without being fully acquainted with its very important contents. *** The Astronomical calculations of this Almanack are composed by DAVID RITTENHOUSE, A.M. of this State.  N.B. They may also be had of Mr. JAMES CLAYPOOLE, at Mr. Gumps, in Water street, York Town.

SATURDAY, MAY 9, 1778
“A letter, of the 8, from the Board of War, was read: Ordered, That it be referred to the Board of Treasury. The Committee on the Treasury brought in a report; Whereupon,
Page 484:
Ordered, That 200 dollars be paid to Charles Cist and James Claypoole, towards defraying their expences on their employment by the treasurer in superintending the making of paper for loan office certificates and bills of exchange; they to be accountable.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 1778
“York Town, June 3, 1778.
The Commissioners of Claims at the Treasury Board, having liquidated and reported the under mentioned Accounts to the Auditor General, he begs leave to report the same to Congress for Allowance: There is due to Claypoole and Cist for expences on a journey to and from Baltimore, Dorsey and Webb's Mills at Elk Ridge, per Order of the Board of Treasury, ... 59.03
•    For 7 days Chair Hire ... 4.60
•    For 7 days Wages at 30/each ... 56.
•    ... 119.63
•There is due to James Claypoole for expences going to, at and from Mr. Fullerton's Mill and the Valley forge and Head Quarters ... 38.66
•    For 14 days Wages at 30/per day ... 56.
•    ... 214.39
•    Making in the whole two hundred and fourteen Dollars and thirty nine
            ninetieths  of a Dollar
Page 566
•They have received from the Treasury the Sum of two Hundred Dollars, which leaves a Ballance due Claypoole and Cist of fourteen Dollars and thirty nine ninetieths of a Dollar. ... 14.39
[Note 1: This report is in the Papers of the Continental Congress, No. 136, II, folio 339. The proper addition of Claypoole's account is twenty nine ninetieths.]
That there is due Claypoole & Cist, a balance of 14 30/90 dollars, for their service and expences on a journey to and from Baltimore, &c. by order of the Board of Treasury:
Ordered, That the said accounts be paid.  Adjourned to 10 o'Clock to Morrow.”
(Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774 to 1789, Volume 11, pages: 484, 565 & 566   http://memory.loc.gov )

1778            Minutes of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania.
              The Council met.
                                                       Philadelphia, Tuesday Novem. 3, 1778.
PRESENT
Hon'ble GEORGE BRYAN, Esq'r, Vice President
John Mackay                Thomas Urie,            )
Joseph Hart                   John Hambright, &  ) Esq'rs
Jacob Arndt                  Thomas Scott           )
...............James Claypoole, Esq'r, offered to the Council Blair M'Clenaghan and David Chambers, both of this City, as sureties of his office as Sheriff of the City and County of Philadelphia, and the same were approved of.

1779              MINUTES OF THE SUPREME EXECUTIVE COUNCIL
              In Council.
                                                                    PHILADELPHIA, Friday, July 2d, 1779.
                                                           PRESENT:
                    His Excellency JOSEPH REED, Esquire, President.
                Hon'ble GEORGE BRYAN, Esq'r, Vice President.
                       Mr. Hart,                                               Mr. Thompson, and
                       Mr. Mackey,                                          Mr. Urie.

               ………………………………………..
                  The three following orders were drawn on the Treasurer in favour
               of James Claypole, Esquire, Sheriff of the city and county of Phila-
               delphia, vizt:
                  One for the sum of ninety-nine pounds nine shillings and eight pence,
                the amount of the bill of costs in the case of John Roberts.
                   One other for the sum of seventy-nine pounds three shillings and
                eleven pence, the amount of his Bill of Costs in the case of Abraham
                Carlisle.
                   And one other for the sum of one hundred and nine pounds three
                shillings and six-pence, the amount of his bill of Costs in the case of
                 George Hardy.
               (Pennsylvania Archives; Series: Colonial Records; Volume: XII; pages 37 and 38)


1780
          JAMES CLAYPOOLE, SHEF. TO PRES.  REED, 1780.

                                                                                        Spruce Street, 14th June, 1780.
Sir,
     Agreeable to your intimation I now have the Honor of relating to your Excellency some particulars respecting the Sheriff’s Office as it regards myself.
     Mr. William Masters and Col. William (sic – s/read Isaac?) Coats were return’d to His late Excellency Thomas Wharton Esquire, the then President and the Honble Supreme Executive Council as Sheriff’s Elect in October 1776 continued uncommissioned as Sheriffs Elect and appointed by Council but without Commission or acting till the said President and Council the 13th  of June 1777 were pleased to Commission me on Mr. Masters finally declining to act or Qualifye.  I continued to do what business came to the Office ‘till September following and in October the British Army having taken possession of the City and the great part of the County of Philadelphia no General Election was held for said County except at the upper District at Jacob Wentz’s and no return as I understand except for Members of the general Assembly—During the Residence of the English in Philadelphia no one was either commissioned or appointed ‘till on my return from General Washington’s Head Quarters to York Town in May 1778 I had a Letter from the Honble George Bryan Esquire signifying a desire I should come down to Lancaster where I received a Commission as Sheriff 13th of June and came down to Philadelphia as soon as possible and on 13th of October following was returned with Mr. Christopher Ludwig as Sheriff Elect and likewise at the following which was the last general Election so that I have been but twice elected to that Office---I beg leave to mention to your Excellency that I have executed the Office under peculiar disadvantages such as the great Difficulty of procuring suitable Assistants so many of our Citizens being engaged in the Army departments and the lowness of the fees they being during the time of my first Commission only the same nominal sum although it would not purchase above one third it would formerly they increased two for one at Lancaster just before my second appointment at which rate and three for one the fees continued ‘till some time in December last when they were increased to Thirty, until which time the Execution of the Office brought me manifestly and unavoidably in Debt more especially in every Instance of Executing Process at any distance from the City when the necessary expenses to myself have frequently cost me more than ten times that all the fees have amounted to and for which I have in no way received any compensation and increased as the fees now are require the best OEconomy to afford a sufficiency for the support of myself and Officers. I beg leave to add that if I should by any means be deprived of having the Office another year, after the ensuing Election I know of no way by which I should be enabled to make up for Deficiencies of the fees for the far greatest part of the time past--- I hope your Excellency will pardon the length of this and am
                                     
                                  Your most obedient
                                                        humble Servant,
                                                                JAMES CLAYPOOLE, Sheriff,

Directed,
   His Excellency Joseph Reed Esquire, President of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania.
(Pennsylvania Archives; Series: 1  Volume: VIII  pp. 321 & 322.)
(Historical note: Despite the above plea, William Will succeeded James Claypoole, as Sheriff of the city of Philadelphia and Philadelphia County, on 14th October, 1780)

May 10, 1780. Pennsylvania Gazette
Philadelphia, May 8, 1780.
DAVID CHAMBERS, Marble Mason, HAS returned to this city, with intention to resume his business, at the north west corner of Race and Fourth streets; where the various kinds of MARBLE WORK will be executed in the neatest and most expeditious manner. Orders left as above, or with James Claypoole, Esq; in Spruce street, will be duly attended to.  He wants a Journeyman who understands the work; none else need apply. Also some Labourers.

April 5, 1781
      David Chambers Claypoole, son of James and Mary Claypoole, married Mary Budd at Christ Church, Philadelphia. (Transcribed Christ Church marriage register, 1709-1800 http://www.christchurchphila.org/Historic_Christ_Church/Collections_Genealogy - accessed January 2008.)

1781 – EFFECTIVE TAX SUPPLY OF THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA – 1781
            DOCK WARD, SOUTH PART. Twenty-three shillings in Every Hundred
            Pounds.
                                                                                                Valuation.            Tax.
            James Claypoole                                                               £50                 11 .6
            (Pennsylvania Archives, Series: 3; Volume: XV; page: 757)

1781 - RETURN OF THE COLLECTORS OF TAXES OF PHILADELPHIA
           COUNTY
                                                                                    PHILAD’A, October 4th, 1781
A Return of the Collectors for the Wards and Townships of the City and County of Philad’a for raising effective supplies.
CITY WARDS.
South Ward, James Claypoole.
(Pennsylvania Archives, Chap: War of the Revolution; page: 461)

November 14, 1782
Mary Claypoole, daughter of James and Mary Claypoole, married James Peale at St. Michael’s & Zion Church, Philadelphia. Pennsylvania Archives. Second Series. Vol. IX., 1880. (Marriage Record of St. Michael’s and Zion Church, Philadelphia 1745-1800  p. 389)

1784 – PENNSYLVANIA ARCHIVES SERIES: 3; VOLUME: XXV; PAGE: 478. 
BEDFORD COUNTY: WARRANTEES OF LAND (1776 -1784)
Claypoole, C. David…………………Acres: 400; Date of Survey: Sept. 6, 1784.
Claypoole, James…………………….Acres: 400; Date of Survey: Sept. 6, 1784.
(Note: James Claypoole’s warranted land was not surveyed nor returned as he died on Sept. 21, 1784.)

September 21, 1784 - Pennsylvania Packet and General Advertiser was published as the first daily newspaper in America by John Dunlap and David Chambers Claypoole, the day on which James Claypoole, Sr., father of David C. Claypoole, died.

The Pennsylvania Mercury and Universal Advertiser, September 24, 1784
"Departed this life on the 21st inst. in the 63d year of his age greatly and deservedly lamented Mr. James Claypoole of this city much esteemed for his probity benevolent disposition sincere friendship and every social virtue. As a testimony of the love and esteem of his fellow-citizens a great number attended his funeral to St. Paul's churchyard on Wednesday last where he was buried. The many good qualities which united in this gentleman render the tribute of reverence justly due to his memory"
(Note: No tombstone or vault inscription for James Claypoole is listed in Appendix F, Outline of The History of Old St. Paul's Church, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1760 -1898 by (Judge) Norris Stanley Barratt. Publisher: The Colonial Society of Pennsylvania, 1917)

Further evidence for the claim that James Claypoole Sr. died in Philadelphia on 21 Sep 1784 is as follows:-

1784 - Letters of Administration, page 1
Philadelphia city and county (illegible) George Campbell Esquire Registrar for the probate of wills and granting letters of administration in and for the city of Philadelphia in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.  To David C. Claypoole administrator of all and singular of the goods and chattels, rights and credits of James Claypoole deceased greetings of the (illegible) the said James Claypoole lately died intestate as is sworn having whilst he lived and at the time of his decease diverse goods and chattels, rights and credits within the said county by means whereof the full disposition and power of granting letters of administration thereof manifestly known to belong to me; I therefore desiring that the goods and chattels rights and credits which were of the said deceased may be well and truly administered, converted and disposed of according to the law, do herby grant unto the said David C. Claypoole  administrator as aforesaid in whose fidelity in this (illegible) very much confide full power, by the tenor of these presents to administer the goods and chattels, rights and credits which were of the said deceased within the said County: as also to ask, collect levy, recover and receive the credits whatsoever of the said deceased which at the time of his death were owing or did in any way belong to him and pay the debts in which the said deceased stood obliged, so far forth as the said goods and chattels rights and credits (illegible) extend according to their rate and order of law: especially of well and truly administering the goods and chattels rights and credits (illegible), of the said deceased and making and making a true and perfect (illegible words) able appraisement thereof, and exhibiting the same (---illegible words) at Philadelphia, on or before the twenty fourth day (illegible words) and also a true and just account, calculation and rec...?  (Illegible words)
Page 2
(Illegible words) upon your solemn oath to render at or before the twenty fourth day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty five or when legally thereunto required and I do by these presents ordain constitute and depute you the said David C. Claypoole administrator of all and singular the goods and chattels rights and credits which were of the said deceased within the limits aforesaid, saving harmless and indemnifying me and all other officers, against all persons by reason of your administration aforesaid and saving all other their rights (illegible).  In testimony whereof I have caused the seal of the said office to be hereunto affixed. Dated at Philadelphia aforesaid the twenty fourth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty four.
George Campbell Registrar
A true copy from the original. August 1st 1794.
Source: 1818 CLAYPOOLE, James. Admin  Book N, Vol. I, page 446 - Delaware, New Castle County Will Index 1683-1920, Administration Index. (Research by Ron Walker; document copy obtained by Bonnie Bergquist, April 2008)

1785 - Graff, (1893) p. 61, mentions George Claypoole's (1674-1730) will. George’s only surviving son was Abraham, who died 1750/51, and in his will, Abraham mentions George Claypoole, James Claypoole, his mother Deborah and Abraham Falconer. When Deborah Hardiman Claypoole died in 1785, the Orphan's Court ruled that Joseph Claypoole, Executor of George Claypoole dec; David C. Claypoole, Administrator of James Claypoole, dec. and Miers Fisher, Administrator of Abraham Falconer, dec. were entitled to distribution of the residue of Abrm. Claypoole's estate.  Graff, Rebecca Irwin (1893) Genealogy of the Claypoole Family of Philadelphia 1588-1893.  J.B. Lippincott Company. Philadelphia, USA

James Claypoole, 1721-1784: “Missing Record! I am terribly sorry to inform you, but the record you are inquiring about is one of our missing records.   Fortunately it is rare that we have missing records, BUT over the course of time we DO have a few (I believe it is less than 20).  Unfortunately your…(times 7) grandfather's record is one of them.   Administration records were not microfilmed and the only backup we had was old ledger books which are also missing and damaged. (they were not maintained).  We made an exhaustive search for the book in question as well as the original record.  Neither could be found……….” (Email dated 7th February, 2008, to Barry Chapman, from Register of Wills, City Hall, Philadelphia, PA)

1786 - Land in Northumberland Co., Pa - Tax arrears notice to James Claypoole.
(The Freeman's Journal or North American Intelligencer, 25 Oct. 1786.)   

1787 - Land in Northumberland Co., Pa - Tax arrears notice to James Claypoole, deceased. (The Freeman's Journal or North American Intelligencer, 30 May, 1787.)

1791 Philadelphia Directory, Published by Biddle.
Claypoole, Mary; widow, address: 184 S., 3rd St.
 
1796 - Gazette of the United States August 4, 1796

"Philadelphia Thursday Evening
The death of Mrs Mary Claypoole, Mother to the Printers of the American Dailey
Advertiser, will prevent the publication of that paper tomorrow."  (Note: the printers of the American Daily Advertiser were David Chambers Claypoole and Septimus Claypoole)
and
 The Philadelphia Minerva Aug. 6, 1796
"Died
On thursday last Mrs. Mary Claypoole"
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________


Appendix II

Timeline for James Claypoole, Jr. (c1743-1822), portrait painter, limner and Commissioner of the Supreme Court, Jamaica, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Kingston, Jamaica, West Indies.

1742 – James Claypoole of Philadelphia, Pa., married Rebecca White of Burlington, N.J., on 24 May, 1742, at Christ Church, Philadelphia. (Transcribed Christ Church marriage register, 1709-1800)

c1743 – James Claypoole, Jr., son of James and Rebecca Claypoole, probably born in Philadelphia, Pa.  (Note: no record of birth or baptism found as at January 2008)
 
1754 – “I Joseph White Junior of the City and County of Burlington in the Western District of New Jersey…………..I Give, Devise and Bequeath unto my Nephew James Claypole the Son of James and Rebecca Claypole the Sum of Five pounds current money as aforesaid to be paid by the Executors hereafter names as Soon as Conveniently they Can after my Desease dated this eighth Day of August 1754” Will proved Dec 2, 1754.
Other beneficiaries: Sister Mary Bryan and nephew Joseph Claypole. Witnesses: Isaac Heulings, Elizabeth Elton, William Heulings. (New Jersey Wills, 1670-1760. Lib. 8, p.184)

1761 - Pennsylvania Gazette. October 29, 1761
“JUST PUBLISHED. A Perspective View of the PENNSYLVANIA HOSPITAL, with the Buildings intended to be erected. Taken from the South-East, by JAMES CLAYPOOLE, junior, and to be sold by him, in Walnut-Street. Philadelphia; Also by *DAVID HALL. Price, One Shilling, plain; or Two, neatly coloured.” -  (*Note: printer of the Pennsylvania Gazette)

The following are excerpts from a letter, from Charles Willson Peale* to his son, Rembrandt, dated Bellafield, October 28, 1812, now archived at the Library of the American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, PA.
"About this time (c1760) West must have made his beginning, his first essays at portraits were perhaps done at Lancaster and I believe encouraged by the Shippen family. About the same period or a little later young Claypoole attempted portrait painting, his father was a house painter and glazer. In 1762 on a visit to Philad. I went to see the paintings of Mr. James Claypoole. He was not at home. I see his pictures and one done by Miss Rench, whom, if I mistake not, he married. After her death he intended to go to London to visit Mr West** with whom he had been intimate---but meeting with a storm was drove into the West Indias. In the Island of Jamaica he married and settled there." and "Miss Polly Rench, sister to Mrs James Claypole, painted in miniature and had the merit of maintaining her mother and a young brother by the work of her pencil....."
*Note(i): Charles Willson Peale came to know James Claypoole Sr. and his family very well indeed - in 1782, Peale's brother James married Mary Claypoole, daughter of James Claypoole Sr. and Mary Chambers Claypoole; in 1782/3, James and/or Charles Peale painted individual portraits of James and Mary Chambers Claypoole and later, Septimus Claypoole, son of James Claypoole Sr. and Mary Chambers Claypoole, married the Peale brothers' niece, Elizabeth 'Betsy' Polk.
**Note(ii): Benjamin West, born 1738 at Swarthmore, Springfield Twp., Pennsylvania; lived in England from 1763 to 1820; co-founder of the Royal Academy of Arts with Sir Joshua Reynolds and from 1792, 2nd President of the Royal Academy).

Richardson (1970) p. 171, referring to Charles W. Peale’s above letter, said:- "James Claypoole, the elder, was in 1762 already married to his second wife, Mary Chambers, and both were well known to Peale, who afterwards painted their portraits. This account therefore refers to James, junior." Richardson, E. P. (1970) JAMES CLAYPOOLE, JUNIOR, RE-DISCOVERED, Art Quarterly, Vol 33, No.2 (Summer), ref. 10.

1764 - published early April to Aug. 10 - James Claypoole, Jr. is said to be the etcher of three political caricatures which attacked the Quaker leader Israel Pemberton and Benjamin Franklin. The caricatures were titled 'The German Bleeds and Bears the Furs', 'An Indian Squaw King Wampum Spies' and 'The Quakers and Franklin'.  "These bitter etchings, with their acutely observed portraits are, I believe, all the work of James Claypoole, Jr., the only artist in Philadelphia with the command of the technique of etching, the skill as a portrait painter, and the political sympathies to be capable of them. The Claypoole family were followers of the Rev. William McClenachan of St. Paul's Church, who strongly sympathised with the Paxton (Paxtang) Boys." Richardson, E.P., The Birth of Political Caricature, pp 71-89, in Philadelphia Printmaking: American Prints before 1860, Editor: Looney, Robert, The Tinicum Press, West Chester, PA. 1977.

1765 - PORTRAITS signed by/or attributed to James Claypoole, Jr. by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Art Catalogue.

•    Mrs John Young (Mary Ann Bedford) - Owner: Henry Francis du Pont
            Winterthur Museum, DE.
•    Robert Shewell (1740-1825) - Owner: Allentown Art Museum, PA
             ( Note: Dr. Benjamin Rush’s Ledger ‘A’- 1770 “Capt: Robert Shewell <Steph:
              Shewell’s Brother>”)
•    Mrs. Robert Shewell (Sarah Sallows) - Owner: Allentown Art Museum, PA
             (Note: The Shewell paintings may have been commissioned to mark the couple’s  marriage, which took place on
              Jan.15, 1764)

Historical note: About 1760, Elizabeth 'Betsy' Shewell and Benjamin West became engaged to be married, and later that year, Benjamin West sailed for Europe. Elizabeth's brother, the wealthy Stephen Shewell, who is said to have opposed her marriage to West, kept Elizabeth (she had lived with him since the deaths of their parents) under lock and key in her room(s) until West's ship had sailed. In 1765, having established himself as an artist of repute in London and secured Royal patronage, West sent for Betsy and arranged for his father to be her chaperone on the long voyage to England. Stephen Shewell got wind of the plan and took action yet again. He sent Elizabeth to Pen Ryn, his wife's Bickley family estate on the Delaware River about 14 miles from Philadelphia, with orders that she be kept under tight security. It is said that late one night, three friends of West, Benjamin Franklin, then about 54 years of age; 18 year-old 'Billy' White and Francis Hopkinson, a future signer of the Declaration of Independence, rescued Betsy by means of a rope ladder from her bedroom window. As soon as she and West's father had boarded the waiting ship, it cast off, dropped down the Delaware River, and set a course for England where Betsy and Benjamin were married without delay. There are three 'Claypoole' connections here - i) Matthew Pratt accompanied Betsy and John West on the voyage to London and became Benjamin West's first American pupil. Pratt, son of Henry Pratt and Rebecca Claypoole Pratt, had been apprenticed to his uncle, James Claypoole Sr., who, in turn, had been apprenticed to Gustavus Hesselius.  ii) James Claypoole, Jr., Pratt's 1st cousin, painted the portraits of Betsy West's brother and sister-in-law, Robert Shewell and Sarah Sallows Shewell - the portraits are owned by Allentown Art Museum, PA. iii) 'Billy' White, later the Reverend William White D.D., chaplain to George Washington and Bishop of Pennsylvania, was the son of Col. Thomas White and Esther Heulings White. Esther was a cousin of Mary Heulings White, mother of Rebecca White who married James Claypoole Sr. on 24 May 1742 at Christ Church, Philadelphia.

1765 – John Beveridge, A.M., Professor of Languages in the College and Academy of Philadelphia, self published his 88 page book of verse(s), Epistolae Familiares…The list of the first 500 subscribers (pp.vii-ix) included “James Claypoole, Junior." Beveridge, J. (1765). Epistolae familiares et alia quaedam miscellanea. Familiar epistles, and other miscellaneous pieces. Philadelphia: Printed for the Author by William Bradford. (“at the London Coffee House, at the corner of Market and front Streets”)   (Early American Imprints, 1st series, no. 9912, Evans)

1765 – 1768:  July 25, 1765 was the date of the last marriage recorded as conducted by the Reverend William MacClenachan at St. Paul’s Church, Philadelphia. The next marriage record for St. Paul’s was dated Sept. 8th, 1768.  (Pennsylvania Archives. Second Series. Vol. IX., 1880.  Marriage Record of St. Paul's Church, Philadelphia. 1759-1806; pages 441-494.) It is probable that the three year gap in St. Paul’s marriage records is why the marriage of James Claypoole and Sarah Rench cannot be found.

1767 – Taxables in Chestnut, Walnut and Lower Delaware Wards, Philadelphia
“We the Subscribers Overseers of the poor have Laid the following Tax of three pence in the Pound and Nine Shillings prhead on the Estates and Inhabitants of the City of Philadelphia To be Applied Toward the Maintenance of the poor of the Said City the ensuing year – Assessed the 20th day April 1767
By Abrm Masson Benjn Loxley Nathaniel Browne William Savery Chas Jervis George Hitner Jr.”……….
Walnut Ward
(29) James Claypole junr       £10         pd         £0-2-6”
Roach, Hannah Benner (1999) Colonial Philadelphians ('Philadelphia’s Colonial Poor Laws and Taxables, 1767') The Genealogical Society Of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia  page: 161.
 
1767 – Burial: “1767, May 10. Sarah, daughter of James Claypoole, Jun.” – Records of Christ Church, Philadelphia. Burials, 1700-1785. Transcript in the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

1767 – Birth & baptism: “Jul 11, 1767 – Walter Rench, son of James and Sarah Claypoole, born Apr 28, 1767”. Records of Christ Church, Philadelphia. Baptisms, 1709-1768. Baptised by the Rev. Richard Peters D.D.

1768 - June 14th, 1768:  Mr James Claypoole, Jun. petitioned the Lodge (no. 2, F. and A. M. of Philadelphia) to become a member was ordered to pay on the Books till the next Lodge Night.
   July 12th, 1768: Jas. Claypoole jun: Petition was unanimously accepted and he received the Degree of an Entered Apprentice, Had the benefit of an enterd apprentice Lecture.
    August 9th, 1768:  Bro. James Claypoole, Jr. received the degree of a Fellow Craft.
  September 13th, 1768: Brother Claypoole having passed the degrees of an Entered Apprentice & Fellow Craft and on Due examination being found worthy was admitted to the Degree of a Master Mason.
1769 – Brother James Claypool(e) attended Lodge Nights on January 16th, 24th and 30th;  February 7th and 28th; March 14th and 28th and then April 11th. On August 8th: “Brother Claypoole inform’d the Lodge that Mr. Zachariah Nieman requests to become a member of the Lodge ordered to remain on the Books till the next Lodge Night of which every Member is to have Notice.” James Claypoole attended the September 12th Lodge Night, at which Mr. Nieman’s application for membership was rejected. The last Lodge Night attended by James Claypoole, Jr. was October 10th, 1769.
   November 14th, 1769 – “Lodge in due form.” Absent members fineable: Danl. Montgomery, Messrs Rutherford – James Claypoole, John Dunlap, Alex Bartram. There is no further mention of James Claypoole, Jr. nor record of any resignation from Lodge no. 2 by James Claypoole.    But, on November 27th, 1771, recorded is Visiting Brother: James Claypoole and on December 1st, 1773, amongst Visiting Brethren: Bro James Claypoole No 7 (Lodge No. 7, Chestertown, Kent Co., Maryland; warrant granted in 1766).  Freemasonry in Pennsylvania, 1727-1907, as shown by the Records of Lodge no. 2, F.(ree) and A.(ccepted) M.(asons) of Philadelphia, from the year A.L. 5757, A.D. 1757  by Norris Stanley Barratt and Julius Friedrich Sachse. Philadelphia, 1908.  (Note: in December, 2007, the Librarian of The Masonic Library and Museum of Pennsylvania confirmed the above Minutes of Lodge No. 2, by electronic mail, to Barry Chapman, Tasmania, Australia)

1769 – PROPRIETARY TAX, CITY OF PHILADELPHIA – 1769
            Walnut Ward – Assessor: William Allison
                                                       Acres    Horses    Cattle    Servants        Tax
             James Claypoole                 -            -              -              -                 -
             (Pennsylvania Archives, Series 3, Volume XIV, page 163)
             (Note: Not James Sr. – see Dock Ward & not James, son of Nathaniel Jr. –
               see Southwark, East)

1768/69 - PORTRAITS
•    Ann Galloway Pemberton (1750-1798) - Owner: Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, PA.
•    Joseph Pemberton (1745-1782) - Owner: Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, PA.
•    Lydia Irons (Mrs. Eleazer McComb) - Owner: H. Rodney Sharp, DE.
      (Note: Eleazer McComb became a Delaware delegate to Continental Congress)

c1760 to c1770 - PORTRAITS
Eleven other portraits, of Claypoole family members and unrelated British American subjects, are attributed to “James Claypoole, Jr.” by the Smithsonian American Art Museum.
Note: these eleven portraits include those of Rebecca and Martha Doz, daughters of Andrew Doz.
With James Claypoole, Sr., Doz was a founding member of St. Paul’s Church, Philadelphia and a Vestryman of St. Paul’s 1762-1764.  Barratt, Norris Stanley (1917)  Outline of The History of Old St. Paul’s Church, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1760-1898. The Colonial Society of Pennsylvania Philadelphia.

1769 – “James Claypool – Painter in Walnut St.” (Note: unlikely to be James Claypoole, Sr., as the 1769 Proprietary Tax List has James Sr.  living in Dock Ward). Roach, Hannah Benner (1999) Colonial Philadelphians ('Genealogical Gleanings from from Dr. Rush's Ledger A') The Genealogical Society Of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia page: 176

1769 – April 3.   No. 1226.    James Claypoole Jun’r.    200 acres.   “On the West side of the North East Branch of Susquehanna about 2 miles above the mouth of Waphallapan Creek whereon is an Old Indian Field and a small stream of water running thr’o it.” This entry marked “See return in the Rejected files of Luzerne County”

1771 – “James Claypoole of the parish of Kingston portrait painter and Helen Frazier of the same parish Spinster were joined together in the holy state of matrimony on the 8th of May 1771.             John Poole Rector of St. Andrew’s”
St Andrews Parish Register, Vol 1 at page 45. LDS FHL 1291698 (Note: despite extensive research, no earlier mention of James Claypoole, nor of any other person named Claypoole/Claypole/Claypool/Cleypole et al could be found in Jamaican BMD records, almanacs etc.)

1772 - Subscribers to a book of poems included “Mr. James Claypoole, Jamaica” Evans, Nathaniel A.M. (1772) Poems on Several Occasions: With Some Other Compositions. Philadelphia. Printed by John Dunlap in Market-Street, M. DCC. LXXII. (Note: Mr. Evans was born in Philadelphia in June 1742 and was destined for a career in commerce by his father, Mr. Edward Evans. But after completing his apprenticeship, he entered the College (University) of Pennsylvania, graduating in 1765 as Master of Arts. Immediately following his graduation, he travelled to England, where, on 21st and 22nd September, 1765 respectively, he was ordained a Deacon and a Priest by the Right Rev. Richard Terrick, Bishop of London. He was appointed a missionary to Gloucester County, New Jersey by the Society for Propogating the Gospel, but after just two years, he died in October 1767, aged 25 years.)

1774 – January 5. A daughter, Dorothy, was born to James and Helena Claypoole and was baptised on 8th January, 1774 at Kingston, Jamaica. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 1, page 239 - LDS FHL 1291763 – this is microfilm held by the Church of Jesus Christ and Latter Day Saints, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.)  Note: Dorothy must have died before 1822, as she isn’t mentioned in her father’s will.
 
1774 - PAINTING. Memorial to E.R. Owner: New Orleans Museum of Arts, LA. Note: this painting was signed & dated Jamaica, 1774 & said to have been purchased by Felix H. Kuntz, of New Orleans, from a Louisiana antiquary who obtained the picture in London, England. Richardson, E.P. (1970) JAMES CLAYPOOLE, JUNIOR, RE-DISCOVERED, Art Quarterly, Vol 33, No.2 (Summer), p. 161.
 
1775 – February 6. A son, James Alexander, was born to James and Helena Claypoole and was baptised on 2nd November, 1775 at Kingston, Jamaica. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 1, page 253 - LDS FHL 1291763). On 3rd August, 1801, he married Elizabeth, daughter of Dr. Edward Frearson of Kingston, Jamaica, at Kingston. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 1, page 166 - LDS FHL 1291763). James A. and Elizabeth Claypoole had at least 8 children before James Alexander Claypoole died in Jamaica in 1829-1830. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 2 and Vol 1, folio 26 - LDS FHL 1291763)

1775 - Kingston, Jamaica. James Claypoole and Mrs Helena Claypoole listed as subscribers to Jonah, an oratorio by Samuel Felsted. In Benjamin West's Jonah: A Previously Overlooked Illustration for the First Oratorio Composed in the New World,  The American Art Journal, Vol. XXVIII,  No's. 1 and 2 (1997), pp. 122-137, by Arthur S. Marks, Professor of Art History at the University of North Carolina, Marks states that Samuel Felsted, the organist at St. Andrews, Kingston, Jamaica composed the oratorio Jonah and to embellish Felsted's score (published in London in 1775), the title page was an engraving of a scene by Benjamin West, the Philadelphia born, Italian trained, London based painter, whose patron was King George III.  In his article, Prof. Marks proposes that James Claypoole, Jr., who knew both men, was the intermediary between Felsted and West, who previously hadn't known each other.

1777 – October 7. A daughter, Elisabeth Anglin, was born to James and Helena Claypoole and was baptised on 6th February, 1779 at Hanover, Jamaica. (Hanover Parish Register, Vol 1, folio 47 - LDS FHL 1224327) In James Claypoole of Jamaica’s 1822 will, she is named as “Eliza Anglin Denniss” and therefore, she died after 1822.

1778 – November 24. A son, Joseph, was born to James and Helena Claypoole and was baptised on 6th February, 1779 at Hanover, Jamaica. (Hanover Parish Register, Vol 1, folio 47 - LDS FHL 122432)  He died aged 2 years and was buried 28th November 1780 at Kingston. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 2, folio 45 - LDS FHL 1291763)
 
 1780 - Kingston, Jamaica. James Claypoole advertised in The Royal Gazette of June 24, 1780.
"James Claypoole, limner, having taken the house, and purchased the stock of colours, varnishes, etc, late in the possession of Mr Humphreys, deceased, begs leave to inform his friends and the public, that with their favour he continues painting portraits in oils and in crayons, as well as miniature: he proposes also to carry on the business of coach painting in every particular. He likewise paints and ornaments rooms, with grotesques, festoons, and figures in Chiara Oscura; and in each of these respective branches hopes he shall be so fortunate as to merit the encouragement he may be honoured with."

1781 - August 14. A son, William, was born to James and Helena Claypoole and was baptised on 26th February, 1782 at Kingston, Jamaica. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 1, page 309 - LDS FHL 1291763) He died aged 2 years and was buried 22nd December, 1783 at Kingston. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 2, folio 74 - LDS FHL 1291763)

1783 – November 23. A son, Thomas, was born to James and Helena Claypoole and was baptised on 16th April, 1785 at Kingston, Jamaica. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 1, page 350 - LDS FHL 1291763) He died just before his 37th birthday and was buried 7th November, 1820 ‘CS’ at Kingston. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 2, folio 437 -  LDS FHL 1291763)

1785 – October 8. A son, Richard, was born to James and Helena Claypoole and was baptised on 30th March, 1786 at Kingston, Jamaica. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 1, page 363 - LDS FHL 1291763) He died an infant and was buried 31st March , 1786 at Kingston. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 2, folio 88 - LDS FHL 1291763)

1787 – January 26. A daughter, Helena, was born to James and Helena Claypoole and was baptised on 17th, December 1786 at Kingston, Jamaica. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 1, page 382 - LDS FHL 1291763) She died after 1822 and was buried at Kingston? (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 1, folio 52 - LDS FHL 1291763)

1788 – April 25. A son, Abraham George, was born to James and Helena Claypoole and was baptised on 1st March, 1791 at Kingston, Jamaica. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 1, page 426 - LDS FHL 1291763) He died aged 12 years and was buried 20th June, 1800 at Kingston. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 2, folio 235 - LDS FHL 1291763)

1789 – December 12. A daughter, Christiana Sarah, was born to James and Helena Claypoole and was baptised on 1st March, 1791 at Kingston, Jamaica. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 1, page 426 - LDS FHL 1291763) She died an infant and was buried 16th May, 1791 at Kingston. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 2, folio 122 - LDS FHL 1291763)

1791 – May 22. A son, Edward, was born to James and Helena Claypoole and was baptised on 18th April, 1792 at Kingston, Jamaica. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 1, page 444 - LDS FHL 1291763) He died an infant and was buried 28th May , 1792 at Kingston. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 2, folio 130  - LDS FHL 1291763)

1792 – October 26. A daughter, Mary Denniss, was born to James and Helena Claypoole and was baptised on 23rd December, 1792 at Kingston, Jamaica. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 1, page 455 - LDS FHL 1291763) She died after 1822.

1794 – April 28. A son, Frazier, was born to James and Helena Claypoole and was baptised on 8th September, 1795 at Kingston, Jamaica. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 1, page ??? - LDS FHL 1291763) He died an infant and was buried 1st October, 1795 at Kingston. The Burial Register spelled his name as “Fraser” (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 2, folio 184  - LDS FHL 1291763)

1796 – July 4. A daughter, Anna, was born to James and Helena Claypoole and was baptised on 7th August, 1797 at Kingston, Jamaica. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 2, page 53  - LDS FHL 1291763) She died an infant and was buried 8th August, 1797 at Kingston. (Kingston Parish Register, Vol 2, folio 205  – LDS FHL 1291763)

Date of birth unknown – “my daughter named Frances Claypoole” mentioned by James Claypoole of Jamaica in his 1822 will.

1796 - Militia of Jamaica.
Commander in Chief, Right Hon. Alexander, Earl of Balcarres 
Eastern Division, Regiment of Horse, Machioneal Troop.
Staff: Mustermaster James Claypoole. (1796 Jamaica Almanac)

1802 - Militia of Jamaica,  (One regiment of Horse, four regiments of Foot), Horse, County of Surry(sic), Machioneal Troop, STAFF - Mustermaster James Claypoole, Esq. (1802 Jamaican Almanac.)

1802 - Jamaican Almanac. County of Surry, (sic) Kingston Magistrates, Coroner, James Claypoole, Esq.

1805 - Jamaican Almanac. Kingston, County of Surrey, Coroner, James Claypoole, Esq.

1805 - Jamaican Almanac. James Claypoole, Esquire, Commissioner (one of six) of the Supreme Court, Kingston.
 
1808 - Jamaican Almanac. Kingston, County of Surrey, Coroner, James Claypoole, Esq.

1808 - Jamaican Almanac. James Claypoole, Esquire, Commissioner (one of seven) of the Supreme Court, Kingston.

1822 – On 23 Mar 1822, James Claypoole was buried at Kingston, Jamaica.
Parish Register Transcripts, 1664-1880; Kingston Parish Burial Index (v.1-4) 1722-1825; Reference: 1816-1825 Volume 2 Folio 453. (LDS FHL INTL Film 1291762)
 

Transcription of the Will of James Claypoole, probated 1822, Jamaica.
I of Jamaica Is (Island) George the Fourth by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland King and of Jamaica Lord defender of the faith do call our trusty  and well beloved John Biggar and Netlam Tory of the city and parish of Kingston Esquires. Know ye that we have constituted, authorised and appointed and by these presents do constitute, authorise and appoint ye or either of ye  to administer an oath unto John I. Drummond of the city and parish of Kingston, Gentleman or any other that are witnesses and can make oath of the signing, sealing,  publishing and declaring of the last will and testament of James Claypoole late of the parish of Kingston, Esquire deceased and thereof you or either of you are to make a due return under your or either of your hands and seals unto our Lieutenant Governor and Commander in Chief of our said Island or to the Governor in Chief of the same for the time being with this power annexed so that such proceedings may be ordered therein as may be according to law. Witness his honor Henry Conran Esquire Lieutenant Governor and Commander in Chief of our said Island at St. Iago delvega (de la Vega) the 22nd day of August anno que domini 1822 and in the third year of our reign Hy (Henry) Conran passed the Secretary's office W. Bullock Secretary Jamaica Island. The execution of the within dedimus protestatum appears by the will and probate thereof hereinto annexed. Given under my hand and seal this 23rd day of August 1822 John Biggar.
    Claypoole James Esq 23rd November 1822. Jamaica Island. This is the last will and testament of me James Claypoole senior of the city and parish of Kingston, Gentleman.
     In the first place I direct my Executrix and Executors hereinafter named to pay off, satisfy and discharge all my just debts, funeral and testamentary expenses as soon after my decease as may be convenient, and in order to enable them so to do I do hereby authorise and empower my said Executrix and Executors hereinafter named or such of them as shall qualify and act under this my will to sell and dispose of my piece or parcel of land situate in Stanton Street and Hospital Lane containing in depth one hundred and fifty feet and in breadth fifty feet, reserving the right of the use of the well to my wife Helena Claypoole and for that purpose to sign and execute  unto the purchaser or purchasers thereof one good & valid title thereto. I give unto my said wife Helena Claypoole all my household furniture, plate, china, glassware, books, horse and chaise and harness.  I give devise and bequeath unto my said wife Helena Claypoole my half lot of land with the buildings thereon situate in Tower Street and George's Lane, also my two Negro men slaves named Francis Cole and Robert Cole, also a Negro boy slave named Samuel Halo to hold the said piece or parcel of land and the said slaves unto the said Helena Claypoole unto her, her heirs and assigns for ever.  I give, devise and bequeath unto my daughter named Helena Claypoole my slaves named Rosanna Johnston and Charlotte Augusta to hold to her, her heirs and assigns for ever. I give devise and bequeath unto my daughter Mary Denniss Claypoole my Negro child named Mary and to hold to her, her heirs and assigns for ever.  I give devise and bequeath unto my daughter named Frances Claypoole my slave named Eleanor Claypoole.  I give devise and bequeath unto my said wife my Negro woman slave named Anne Williams and her son Cudjoe for and during the term of her natural life and from and immediately after her decease to be manumized. And I do hereby direct and empower my Executors to purchase a small piece of land for the use of the said Anne Williams and her son Cudjoe as soon as may be convenient after the death of my said wife and to erect thereon a small hut for their comfort.  I give all my paintings and prints of whatever description and my Paint Box to my said wife.  I give unto my son James Claypoole my gold headed cane and my painting materials and apparatus.  I earnestly request my beloved wife to make some provision for her daughter Eliza Anglin Denniss in the event of her surviving her at and as to all the rest, residue and remainder of my estate real and personal I give devise and bequeath the same unto my said wife Helena Claypoole to hold to her, her heirs and assigns for ever as tenants in common. I do hereby nominate, constitute and appoint my said wife Helena Claypoole Executrix and my said son James Claypoole and John Fasky of the city of Kingston Esquire Executors of this my last will and testament here by revoking all former wills.  I do declare this only to be and contain my last will and testament. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 14th day of March 1822.    James Claypoole
Signed, sealed, published and declared by the said James Claypoole as and for his last will and testament in the presence of us who in his presence at his request and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as witnesses thereto:
John I. Drummond, James Dunkerley, John Dunkerley of Jamaica Island.
     In obedience to the dedimus protestatum hereunto annexed I have administered an oath unto John I. Drummond Gentleman who being duly sworn upon the holy Evangelists deposeth and saith that he was present  and did see James Claypoole the Testator in the annexed instrument of writing named being at that time of sound and disposing mind, memory and understanding, sign, seal publish and declare the same as and for his last will and testament and at the same time James Dunkerley and John Dunkerley of the city and parish of Kingston Gentlemen were also present and together with him subscribed their names as witnesses to the same in the presence of the said Testator and further that he knows nothing of any will since made by the said Testator that can tend to the disadvantage of the will hereunto annexed. Given under my hand and seal this 23rd day of August anno que domini 1822.
John O. Biggar.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________



Appendix III - Timeline for James Claypoole, c1742-c1813, of Bedford, Somerset & Armstrong Counties, Pennsylvania


1763 - March 8th, 1763, James Claypoole married Lucia (Lucretia?) Garwood at Christ Church, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Transcribed records of Christ Church, Philadelphia -

http://www.christchurchphila.org/Historic_Christ_Church/Collections_Genealogy - accessed January 2008)

1766 - George Claypoole, born “Pennsylvania” (Source: Armstrong County, Pa., Her People, Past and Present, pages 914 - 915. J.H. Beers & Co., 1914.) - but also, US Federal Census 1850 Armstrong Co., PA, age 79, born Pa, which yields a year of birth of 1770/71.  Note: George was a son of James and Lucretia Claypoole. (Source: Document dated 13 June, 1813, that shows deceased’s estate funds paid to James Claypole, George Claypole, Jehu Claypole, Sam’l Claypole, David Claypole and Hezekiah Claypole.)

1770/1771 - Joseph Claypole, born “Delaware” (US Federal Census 1850 Armstrong Co., PA, age 79) Note: Joseph was a son of James and Lucretia Claypoole.

1772 - Taxable inhabitants of Brothers Valley Twp., Bedford County, Pa included “James Claypole;  200 acres; 1 improved acre.” Storey, Henry Wilson (1907) History of Cambria County Pennsylvania: With Genealogical Memoirs Vol. 1 The Lewis Publishing Company. New York. Chicago. Note: In March, 1768, the Iroquois signed the Fort Stanwix treaty which sold a substantial area of land to the British Government and the Penn's share of this land became Bedford County, Pennsylvania. From 3rd April, 1769, public land west of the Allegheny Mountains was  opened to settlers, including Bedford County, and on 16th April, 1771, Brothers Valley Township, Bedford Co., Pa. was formed.
 
1773 - PA Archives - Tax list for Brothers Valley Twp., Bedford Co., Pa, included "James Claypole".

1776 - Tax list for Turkey Foot Twp., Bedford County, Pa, included "James Claypole". (Note: Turkey Foot Twp. formed from Brothers Valley Twp.) 

1779 - David Claypole, born “New Jersey” (US Federal Census 1850 Armstrong Co., PA, age 71) Note: David was a son of James and Lucretia Claypoole. (Source: Document dated 13 June, 1813, that shows deceased’s estate funds paid to James Claypole, George Claypole, Jehu Claypole, Sam’l Claypole, David Claypole and Hezekiah Claypole.)

1779 - James Claypoole/Claypole is missing from the 1779 tax list for Bedford County, PA.

1782 - “Situated one mile south of Castleman River between said river and Negro Mountain, now Elklick Twp., Somerset County and originally surveyed the 21st day of March 1785 in pursuance of a warrant dated 27th day of January 1785 granted to James Claypole for 300 acres including improvements that began the 1st day of March 1782.” (Survey Book, Vol. 2, page 86, Somerset County, PA.) Note: Somerset County was formed from Bedford County 17 April 1795.

1783 - PA Archives, Tax list for Milford Twp., Bedford County, PA included “James Claypole” Note: Milford Twp. was formed from Turkeyfoot Twp.


1784 - PA Archives, Census of Milford Twp. Bedford County, PA included “James Claypole   9 whites” Note: This would be James and Lucretia and their children James, Joseph, Hezekiah, Jehu, George, Samuel, and David.

1789 - PA Archives, Bedford County. A list of the Inhabitants of Elk Lick Township made subject to the Militia Laws this State—taken by John Burger, Feby. 7th, 1789, included “James Claypole” Note: Elklick Twp. was formed from Milford Twp.

1790 - James Claypole does not appear anywhere on the 1790 census.

1791 - History of Armstrong County by Robert Walter Smith, Esq.
“In the spring or summer of 1791, James Claypole, as related to the writer by his grandsons, with his wife and 6 children settled near the mouth of Truby’s run. Fearing danger of Indians attacking he prepared a raft and descended to the river to Pittsburgh where he resided a short time and removed to his former residence on the Monongahela nearly opposite Turtle Creek.”
Note: This may be why James is not found on the 1790 census. Few settlers were here at that time and were probably missed.

1794 - Tax list Allegheny County, PA, Mifflin Twp.  included “James Claypole”.
Note: This would be the former residence mentioned above.

1796 – History of Armstrong County by Robert Walter Smith, Esq.
“A blockhouse called the Claypole Blockhouse was built by James Claypole about 80 rods
below Fort Run near the river bank. It must have been between 1790 and 1796. His wife
Lavinia (sic) Claypole is said to have died in the last mentioned year.”
Note: Since James was listed on the 1794 Tax list for Allegheny County he may have returned shortly before Lucretia died – she was said to have been buried near the blockhouse in 1796.

1798 - Tax List for Westmoreland County. Armstrong  Twp.  included “James Claypole”. Note: Armstrong County was formed from part of Westmoreland County in 1800.

1800 - While James Claypole is not found on the 1800 census, his sons James, Joseph, and Hezekiah are enumerated in Armstrong County.

1805 - James Claypole and his wife Rachel sell lot # 3 in Kittanning, Armstrong County to James McClurg, who purchased the land on 27 December 1805. The sale/purchase was recorded on 7 April 1808. This deed is signed James X Claypole (his mark) and Rachel X Claypole (her mark), indicating neither James nor Rachel could write. (Land Deed, Armstrong County Court House, Vol. 9, pages 259 & 260.)  Note: It is not known when James Claypole married Rachel, following the death of his first wife, Lucretia. This deed and the following estate papers are the only known records to date of his wife Rachel.

1813 - James Claypole died without a will. The exact date of his death is unknown. His estate papers show for 12 July 1813, a list of Goods and Chattels of James Claypole deceased sold at public vendue. The post sale distribution document shows cash paid to James Claypole, George Claypole, Jehu Claypole, Sam’l Claypole, David Claypole and Hezekiah Claypole. This document, dated 13 June 1813, names Rachel Claypole as wife of James Claypole, deceased.

Researched and compiled by Kathie Young, Armstrong Co., PA, USA, with some additional material and references from Barry Chapman.  Copyright 2005-2008.
           
Further Information (added by Barry Chapman, (2008) Tasmania, Australia)

DAVID H. CLAYPOOLE, a worthy descendant of an old pioneer family of Armstrong county and a respected resident of North Buffalo township, is a son of Samuel and Sarah (Campbell) Claypoole, and was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, May 15, 1811.
His paternal grandfather, James Claypoole, was born in England and came to Pennsylvania, where he settled in Kittanning township, this county, from which he was driven by the Indians. He was a farmer, married and had eight children.
One of his sons was Samuel Claypoole, the father of David H. Claypoole. He was a farmer by occupation, a republican in politics, a member of the Baptist church and married Sarah Campbell. They had nine children, eight sons and one daughter: John, James, Samuel, David H., Joseph, William, George, Levi and Isabelle.
David H. Claypoole was reared on his father's farm and received what few educational advantages were offered by the subscription schools of that period. Reared on a farm and trained to farming, he has always followed that business. He owns a good farm of ninety-five acres of well-improved land in North Buffalo township.
In 1833 he married Sarah Hickey, daughter of William and Ellen Hickey, of Bedford county. To Mr. and Mrs. Claypoole have been born seven children, four sons and three daughters: John H., who was born June 9, 1834, and maried Mary Shearer; Samuel, born June 28, 1837, enlisted in 62d regiment, Pa. Vols., and was wounded in the battle of Cold Harbor May 6, and died in Washington City August 4, 1864; Henry, who was born November 9, 1839, served three years in the 78th Pa. Vols., was wounded December 31, 1862, at the battle of Stone River, married Margaret Boner and is now engaged in farming; Eliza, born May 28, 1842, and wife of George Bowser, a farmer; Wilson L., born April 3, 1844; Hannah J., who was born February 23, 1847, married to Harvey Bowser, and died February 20, 1873; and Sarah Matilda, who was born July 6, 1855, and died February 6, 1883.
David H. Claypoole has been a republican ever since the organization of that party and has never wavered in his support of the principles and policy of the Republican party. He is a member of the Baptist church at Franklin Union and has never sought for any office within the gift of his party or church. The results of his years of toil and labor are to be seen in the highly improved condition of his farm, which is very productive.”
(Biographical And Historical Cyclopedia Of Indiana And Armstrong Counties, Pennsylvania; Published By, John M. Gresham & Co., Managed By, Samuel T. Wiley, Historian And Editor, Nos. 1218 and 1220 Filbert Street, Philadelphia, 1891. (pp 589-590)


DAVID D. CLAYPOLE. One of the many comfortably situated and prosperous farmers of South Buffalo township is David D. Claypole. He is a son of David and Elizabeth (Claypole) Claypole, and was born about a mile from Worthington, in East Franklin township, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, March 11, 1818.
         David Claypole came to Kittanning while the Indians still had their hunting-grounds in the vicinity of that place. He was a farmer by occupation, a member of the Baptist church, and an old-time democrat of the Jeffersonian type. He married Elizabeth Claypole, daughter of Samuel Claypole, of East Franklin township, and to their union were born ten children, seven sons and three daughters: Joseph, Isabella, Robert, Jane, Margaret, Hezekiah, William, James, David D. and Samuel.
         David D. Claypole grew to manhood on the home farm, attended the early subscription schools of his native township, and at the end of his school days engaged in farming, which he has followed ever since.
         He married Mary Campbell, and they have had seven children, three sons and four daughters: Nancy J., who was born November 5, 1838, and married to George Davis and after his death to James Shearer; John C., born August 11, 1840, and died in the Union army during the late civil war; Mary C., born June 22, 1842, and wife of Jacob Householder; Margaret A., born January 16, 1845; Esther E., born July 10, 1848, and married to John Claypole; and Joseph C., born June 1, 1851.
         Mrs. Claypole died November 8, 1854, and Mr. Claypole married for his second wife, Elizabeth Boalman. To this second union were born four children, one son and three daughters: Lottie, born Mrch 26, 1859; Bothnia E., born April 23, 1860, and married to Cromwell Claypole; Mary Caroline, born December 24, 1861, wife of James Claypole; and Milton B., who was born March 12, 1865. Mrs. Elizabeth (Boalman) Claypole died November 22, 1866, and Mr. Claypole afterwards married Sarah Geary, who died in 1887.  Mr. Claypole is a democrat, a good farmer, and stands well as a citizen wherever he is known.”
(Biographical And Historical Cyclopedia Of Indiana And Armstrong Counties, Pennsylvania Published by John M. Gresham & Co., Managed by Samuel T. Wiley, Historian And Editor, Nos. 1218 and 1220 Filbert Street, Philadelphia, 1891. (p. 590)

JAMES E. CLAYPOOLE, manager and superintendent of the Buffalo Woollen Mills, at Worthington, Pa., was born in 1850, in West Franklin Township, Armstrong Co., Pa., a son of James and Mary Claypoole, grandson of George Claypoole, and great-grandson of James Claypoole.
James Claypoole was born near Philadelphia, Pa., and at a very early day endeavored to establish a home in Manor Township, Armstrong county, but was driven away by the Indians. Some years afterward he returned to Manor township and was one of the early settlers, seeing much hardship but successfully defending himself and family from further Indian attacks.
George Claypoole, son of James, was born in Armstrong county and his life was spent in agricultural work. He married a member of the Campbell family, and they had the following children : James, George, Abraham, Joseph, Margaret, Rebecca, Mary Ann and Lucretia. George Claypoole died in the year 1858, at the age of ninety-two years.
James Claypoole, son of George and father of James E. Claypoole, was born and reared in Armstrong county and followed the peaceful life of a farmer. He was a man of sound judgment and at times was elected to township offices. His first marriage was to Jane Sloan, who died without issue, and his second union was with Mary J. Black. Five children were born to them, namely: James E., George H., Maggie A., John S., and Mary E. The father of the above family died in 1883, and the mother in 1896. They were faithful members of the Presbyterian Church.
James E. Claypoole attended the local schools, the Slate Lick high school, and the Worthington Select School, after which he accepted a clerical position in the store of W. F. Rumberger, of Craigsville, and remained there for one year. From 1873 until 1886 he was a clerk in the store of Graff & Firth, of Buffalo Mills, and the was promoted to manager, at which time he became a stockholder as well as superintendent of the Buffalo Woolen Mills, as stated above. These mills were established in 1865. The product up to 1888 was largely flannels and stocking yarns; since then the main product has been wool bed blankets, which are in great demand today, having won their way through the excellence of their manufacturer. The business is in a prosperous condition.
In 1877 Mr. Claypoole was married to Sarah E. Morrison, daughter of John C. Morrison of Worthington, Pa., and they have six children as follows: Mary Bell, who is the wife of Dr. Maxwell; Margaret F., who is the wife of James Rayburn; John N., James A., who married Miss Boarts; Greta, and Samuel. For forty five years Mr. Claypoole has been an active member of the Presbyterian Church, in which he has been a trustee for more than forty years and a teacher in the Sunday school for over twenty years. He has been a member as well as a leader of the choir ever since he united with the church, in 1868.” 
(Source: Armstrong County, Pa., Her People, Past and Present, pages 914 - 915. J.H. Beers & Co., 1914. Transcribed February 1999 by Nanci Michalkiewicz  for the Armstrong County Beers Project. Published 1999 by the Armstrong County Pennsylvania Genealogy Project).
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________



Appendix IV - Some contemporaries of 
James Claypoole Sr. of  Philadelphia Co., Pennsylvania, in 1755.


In Pursuance of an ACT of ASSEMBLY, entitled, An Act to encourage the Establishing of an Hospital for the Relief of the Sick Poor of this province, and for the Reception and Cure of Lunaticks, the following LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS from the beginning to this time, is now published.

A
William Allen, William Attwood, John Armitt, Stephen Anthony, Nathaniel Allen, Nehemiah Allen, Lawrence Anderson, Anonymus, Benjamin Armitage Jr, George Ashbridge of Goshen, Chester County; Matthias Aspden, Michael Agie, Alexander Allaire.
B
Thomas Bond, Phineas Bond, Anthony Benezet, Daniel Benezet, William Blair, John Bleakly Jr, John Bowman of Germantown, William Branson, John Bailey, William Ball, John Bankson, Jacob Bankson, William Bard, John Baynton, Gunning Bedford, Philip Benezet, Esther Bikkerdike of Chester County, John Biddle, John Blakey, a Hatter; John Bleakly Sr, Samuel Bonnell, Thomas Boude, Thomas Bourne, William Bradford, John Bringhurst, Benjamin Britton, John Brooks, Thomas Brooks, Nicholas Brosius, Jeremiah Brown of Nottingham, Chester County, William Buckley of Bristol, George
Bullock, Samuel Burkloe, John Burr, Jacob Byerly.
C
Joshua Crosby, Thomas Cadwallader, Thomas Crosby, John Coates, John Campbell, Samuel Caruthers, David Chambers, William Chancellor, James Chattin, Samuel Cheesman, James Child, John Church, William Clampsser, William Clark, Matthew Clarkson, James Claypoole, William Clemm, James Clewlow, Thomas Clifford, Henry Clifton, Matthias Cline, Warwick Coates, John Coates Jr, Thomas Coates Jr, William Coleman, William Cooper, Jacob Cooper, James Coultas, Joseph Cox, Moses Cox, William Craddock, John Cresson, Robert Cross, Matthias Culpt.
D
David Deshler, Thomas Davis, Joseph Davis, a Cordwainer; Joseph Davis, a Saddler; Anthony Deshler, William Dilworth, John Dixon, Mary Dougherty of Lancaster, William Dowell, John Drinker, Jacob Duche, Edward Duffield, Daniel Dupuy.
E
Jeremiah Elfreth, Thomas Ellis, George Emlen, Joshua Emlen, Samuel Emlen Jr, Robert Erwin, Daniel Etter, Edward Evans, Evan Evans, John Everley, Charles Ewald.
F
Benjamin Franklin, Richard Farmar, William Fishbourn, Joseph Fox, Joshua Fisher, William Fisher, Enoch Flower, Hugh Forbes, Standish Ford, William Franklin, David Franks, Solomon Fussell.
G
Thomas Graeme, Isaac Greenleafe, William Griffitts, Joseph Galloway, William Gardner, Isaac Garrigues, Matthias Gensele, Joseph Gibbons of Chester County, Walter Goodman, John Goodwin Jr, Thomas Gordon, William Grant, Christian Grasholt, Joseph Gray, George Gray, a Brewer; Robert Greenway, Nathaniel Grubb of Chester County.
H
David Hall, Arent Hassert, Adam Harber, Samuel Hazard, Edward Hicks, Augustine Hicks, Joshua Howell, John Hughes, Thomas Hallowell, Robert Harding, John Hatkinson, Charles Harrison, Eden Haydock, John Head Jr, Michael Hillegas, William Hinton, George Hitner, Enoch Hobart, William Hodge, Thomas Holland, Michael Holling, William Hopkins, Samuel Howell, Joseph Huddle, William Hudson, Hugh Hughes, Philip Hulbert, Joshua Humphries of Haverford, Chester County.
J
Isaac Jones, Robert Janney, Derick Johnson of Germantown, Abel James, Charles Jones, Matthew Johns, Joseph James of Chester County, Thomas Jervis, Joseph Johnson, a Tinman; Joseph Johnson of Wicacoa, John Jones, a Merchant; John Jones the Cordwainer, Robert Jones of Merion.
K
Matthias Koplin of Skippack, John Kearsley, John Kearsley Jr, Joseph King, Peter Keen, Benjamin Kendall, Henry Kepley, Mahlon Kirkbride of Bucks County, John Knowles of Chester County, Paul Kripner, Mark Kuhl, Samuel Kuhl.
L
Thomas Lightfoot, Jacob Lewis, Thomas Lawrence Jr, Joseph Lownes, James Lownes, Benjamin Loxley, John Laffels, Joseph Leech, Thomas Livezey Jr. of near Germantown, William Logan, James Logan, John Lord, Charles Lyon.
M
Samuel Preston Moore, Robert Moore, Anthony Morris, Anthony Morris Jr, Joseph Morris, Evan Morgan, Jonathan Mifflin, Rees Meredith, Wight Massey, John Meas, George Mifflin, John Mifflin, William Moode, Jacob Maag, James Mackey, Joshua Maddox, Joseph Marriott, Christopher Marshall, William Masters, Hugh Matthews, Thomas Maule, Leonard Melchior, Charles Meredith, Samuel Mifflin Jr, Benjamin Mifflin, John Mifflin Jr, George Miller of Chester County, William Moore, Charles Moore, a Hatter;  Samuel Morris, the Sheriff of Philadelphia; Morris Morris Jr, Joshua Morris of Abington, John Morris of Plymouth, James Murgatroyd.
N
Isaac Norris, Charles Norris, Samuel Neave, Peter Nygh, John Naglee, John Nelson, William Nicholson, John Nixon, Samuel Noble.
O
John Ord, Daniel Offley.
P
Israel Pemberton, Israel Pemberton Jr, James Pemberton, Richard Peters, William Plumsted, John Pole, Samuel Powell, Edward Penington, John Pemberton, John Palmer, Joseph Parker of Chester, William Parr, Richard Partridge of London, Thomas Paschall, Oswald Peele, James Peller, Bartholomew Penrose, William Peters of Chester County, Jacob Pfiston, Mary Plumsted by legacy, Samuel Powell the Brass Founder.
R
John Reynell, John Redman, Samuel Rhoads, Hugh Roberts, Andrew Rambo, John Reardon, Francis Rawle, Joseph Redman, Joseph Richardson, Merchant, Francis Richardson, Joseph Richardson the Silversmith, Daniel Roberdeau, John Roberts of Merion,a Miller; John Ross, William Rush.
S
John Smith, Charles Stedman, Alexander Stedman, Christopher Sour of Germantown, Peter Sonmans, Samuel Sansom, Edward Shippen, William Shippen, Joseph Saunders, Thomas Say, John Sweighauser, Stephen Shewell, Joseph Shewell, William Shipley, Edward Shippen Jr, Jacob Shoemaker, Jacob Shoemaker Jr, Samuel Smith, Thomas Smith, William Smith, Robert Smith the Carpenter, Isaac Snowdon, William Standley, Moses Standley, Valentine Standley, Joseph Stennard, James Stephens, James Stone, Daniel Stonemitz, Charles Stow Jr, Thomas Stretch, Joseph Stretch, Isaac Stretch, Samuel Swift of the Manor of Moreland.
T
Robert Tuite, Joseph Trotter, Adam Thomson, Christopher Thomson, Thomas Tillbury, Peter Turner.
U
John Unbekand of Germantown, William Vanderspiegle, per annum during life.
W
Caspar Wistar, John Wistar, Joseph Wharton, William Wallace, Townsend White, John Wier, Robert Willan, Abraham Waggoner of Perkiomen, Samuel Wallace, Robert Waln, Jeremiah Warder, Edward Warner by legacy, Joseph Watkins, Robert Wakely, George Wescott, James West, Charles West, Charles West, junior, James White, William Whitebread, Anthony Wilkinson, Brian Wilkinson, Daniel Williams, Joseph Wills, Edmund Windor, Jacob Winey, Richard Wistar, Edmund Woolley, Joseph Wood, James Wood, Peter Worrall of Lancaster, James Wright of Lancaster County.
Y
William Young, per annum during life.
Z
Lloyd Zachary, Isaac Zane, Jonathan Zane.

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